High Desert Historic Bottle Website homepage banner

...located in the beautiful High Desert of Eastern Oregon

FOR SALE - Bottles & Bottle Books
& other collectibles

Click HERE to go straight to the "BOTTLES FOR SALE" pages links



LINKS TO MY PAGES

Homepage

Medicinal Tonics

Bottle Glossary

Western Americana Books For Sale

Photos & Links

My eBay Page

Historic Bottle Website

This and the associated linked web pages are my current listings of antique or "historic" bottles, bottle books, and other collectibles for sale.

I try to be as comprehensive as possible in describing bottle condition but am not perfect (thus the money back guarantee).  Many of the "flaws" or condition issues that I point out are often overlooked by others.  I also try to take representative pictures of all the bottles listed, though some bottles can defy accurate pictorial representation.  Click on the highlighted link(s) in each listing description to see the picture(s) of the specific item for sale. 

If you would like additional digital pictures or information, please e-mail me (link below). 

If you have any concerns about the quality or reliability of my transactions, check my extensive (and perfect) eBay buyer & (sometimes) seller feedback: eBay Feedback for jfcutter.

To help properly describe the bottles on this list or for the people who found this page and have some basic questions about antique bottles, I have another web page that is a glossary of some major antique bottle descriptive terms. It is found at the following link - Bottle Description & Condition Glossary.  It includes more links to pictures to help portray some of the bottle characteristic described.

My email is -
I ask that people trying to first contact me please use the email address above not call me by searching out my phone number on the internet.
 

Important Information For Buyers 

Shipping & insurance is in addition to the listed price on all bottles & collectibles and will be calculated at as close as I can estimate to the actual cost via the USPS website depending on the weight of the item and your zip code.  No additional packaging or handling fees (and I totally use recycled materials from my past purchases). 

All books are postpaid within the U. S. @ the media mail rate; faster shipping is extra.

For an idea of the shipping costs, click on the following USPS link to calculate the cost from my zip code of 97624 - DOMESTIC RATE CALCULATOR.  Small bottles usually ship at under 2 pounds packed, average sizes at 2-3 pounds with large, multiple and/or heavier glass items at sometimes a 4 or rarely 5 pounds. 

I will ship to the U. S. and Canada but typically not to other overseas addresses any longer due to the difficulty in determining shipping costs ahead of time - even to Canada at times.  However, feel free to inquire as I do make some  exceptions depending on the item.

Insurance is (usually) included and noted in my shipping quote back to you upon inquiry though I suppose it is optional.  I try to pack well but one never knows how packages will be treated so I always prefer it. 

I offer a 7 day, no questions asked, 100% (sales price) money back guarantee on everything I sell!  It's the only way to do "e-business."

Payment can be made via personal or cashiers checks or money orders and could entail up to a 5 business day (after receipt) clearing time, though I cash checks electronically now which is usually faster.  My mailing address for sending payment will be provided via email once the total price - with shipping - is determined. 

I can accept credit cards only via PayPal if the buyer is willing to help with the added PayPal fees payment (i.e., 3+% of the total).  Please inquire.  I WILL gladly accept PayPal if it is as a person-to-person transfer (i.e., from bank account or PayPal balance) as it entails no fees to the buyer or seller.  My account email provided for transfer if PayPal is requested.

Please confirm item availability prior to sending any type payment and include your zip code in your message so that the shipping can be calculated.

I also have a books-for-sale (non-bottle books) list if you click on the following link: BOOKS FOR SALE. Though limited in scope, this list has a variety of books, with an emphasis on Western Americana books.

 



 

 

 

ANTIQUE BOTTLES FOR SALE

▪The bottle categories are listed in the menu below.
▪Click on each category link to move to that section. 
▪The first category - "Western American Bottles" - is on this webpage below.

The other categories are on separately linked pages.
Use the browser back arrow to return to this menu from any of the category pages.
 

WESTERN AMERICAN BOTTLES
BITTERS
EARLY AMERICAN BOTTLES & FLASKS
MEDICINAL "TONIC" BOTTLES
OTHER MEDICINAL BOTTLES
FOODS & CANNING JARS
SODA/MINERAL WATER & BEER
LIQUOR & MISC. BOTTLES and COLLECTIBLES
BOTTLE BOOKS

Click on the thumbnail picture, highlighted title links, or other links within each listing to see pictures of the bottles described. 

My email is -
I ask that people trying to first contact me please use the email address above not call me by searching out my phone number on the internet.

 


Western American Bottles

Liquor/Spirits
 
 

SIMMOND'S / NABOB / TRADE (Sultan with hookah and attendant) MARK / PURE / KY BOURBON / WHISKEY - All this embossed on this well known but quite scarce, full faced, Western "picture" whiskey cylinder fifth.  This example is listed in the late John Thomas's most recent book (2002) as #142A and is the earliest of this short series of cylinders dating from the late 1870s to early 1880s.  Apparently this whiskey was advertised in 1882 as being  "Strongly recommended by the medical faculty (what "faculty" isn't noted!) for all cases of nervousness, dyspepsia, chills, etc..."  Like many high alcohol products of that era, it was purported to have high medicinal value.  (Reminds me that my dad always noted that his stops at the state liquor store in Oregon were needed to get his "medicine"!)  Thomas also notes that many of these were found in Nevada in the usual mining camp areas like Hamilton, Eureka, and Virginia City as well as the Sierra Nevada and some other mining areas in California.  Although a San Francisco bottled product (George Simmond's & Co. in business from 1877 to 1888 according to Thomas) these were one of the earlier German made "Western" cylinders dating from the noted range above. 

As with most all of these type amber to red-amber German made Western-used whiskey cylinders this example has a nice and sloppy applied top (click applied top to view such), heavily whittled throughout the body, a high slightly pointed/domed base, and a color that is a medium orange to somewhat reddish amber getting redder towards the base as the images show.  This is a beautiful window bottle with that color and crudity!  Condition is very good to excellent (aka close to mint) with some light wear and scuffing in a few places (largely on the back) but no chips, cracks or other post-manufacturing damage.  Thomas's book lists the mid-range value of these at a seemingly high $2500; this very nice example is offered for significantly less.  $795

 

FLECKENSTEIN & MAYER, / FM&CO monogram / PORTLAND, OREGON. - This is a very nice example of one of the better bottles from Oregon - the proprietary mold, "knife edge" union oval, Fleckenstein & Mayer pint.  The flask is 7.5" tall, has a crudely applied double ring lip or finish (click on image to enlarge), the typical "cross" on the post-molded base, and is not air vented resulting in the typical flattened - though bold - embossing.  These flasks are pretty rare and one of the few Western flasks I dug in the Portland urban-development area as a teenager in the 1960s.  The flask offered here is a second example acquired later (keeping the dug one!) though this one is probably a better example with bolder embossing, sloppier top, and a rich medium amber color with a hint of reddishness to it.  Dating from the late 1870s to very early 1880s (John Thomas dated these flasks 1877 to 1885) these are a product of the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works as evidenced by the unknown, but famous, mold engraver that used the distinctive curved "R's" that were a trade mark of San Francisco glass company products from about 1870 to the mid-1880s - the "golden era" of spectacular Western glass!  Since the embossing can be variably "light" on these flasks, the following is a link to a close-up of such showing that it is quite bold for this mold:  close-up of the embossing.  The offered example is in near mint condition with an assortment of long teardrop type bubbles in the glass, some body crudity & stretch marks in the neck and the really nice "globby top" to top it off.  No chips, cracks, dings, or staining though it does have a few light scratches and very small scuff spots on the reverse side.  Great example of a classic early Oregon liquor flask!   SOLD!

 

Western Knife-edge Union Oval liquor flask - Here is a really nice, albeit unembossed, knife edge pint "union oval" style flask almost certainly made at the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works in the later 1870s to very early 1880 .  I've never encountered a bona fide, attributable "Eastern" made flask that had the distinctive sharp "knife" edge that some of these Western made flasks have, but who knows.  This flask came from the central Oregon coast so that helps confirm its origin more.  Side by side with the Fleckenstein pint above, they are almost identical in size and design sans embossing.  However, this unembossed jewel has a nicer, fatter top and a color that is a beautiful lightish yellow amber with just a touch of green...to my eye when sitting next to a "plain" medium amber bottle.  The colors in the images are pretty close to what I see in daylight here.  This flask does not have the the "X" or cross on the base that the Fleckenstein's have, but is otherwise almost identical in shape.  Click base view to see such.  Details of this flask is that it is almost 7.5" tall, has an applied double ring finish/lip with some dripage, blown in a post-base mold, and lacks air venting markings.   This flask is essentially mint with a few tiny scuff marks and a very light scratch down one side a few inches...and hard to see.  NO chips, cracks, flashes, or staining.  (An identical example - maybe even not as nice - was recently sold on eBay for $85.) A very nice window bottle!  $45

 

CUTTER / O.K. WHISKY. / J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON / TRADE ("slugged" on crown) MARK / (barrel with J. H. C.) / C. P. MOORMAN / MANUFACTURER / LOUISVILLE , K. Y. - If that wasn't enough embossing just on the front side, the reverse also has A. P. HOTALING'S / O. K. / CUTTER WHISKY on the upper body and shoulder.  These are popular whiskey bottles with Western collectors for obvious reasons - the myriad of embossing prime among them - as well as the fact that they are relatively available for a Western glob top cylinder.  (This is Thomas #41 dating from the mid-1870s to probably early 1880s.)  This example is probably the most distinctly embossed example I've ever seen for a whiskey that is usually pretty decently embossed to begin with.  Click close-up of the embossing to see the front embossing closer up.  This example has an applied lip - aka "glob top" - with just a bit of slop over.  Click close-up of the lip/finish to see such.  The color is a bright, lighter orange amber that is stunning in the window; the images catch the color pretty well.  The bottle also has nice bubbles scattered throughout the glass, stretch marks on the neck and some surface swirls in the glass.  Condition is near mint with no chips, cracks or significant staining inside or out (a few very, very minor patches of hard-to-see dullness), a few minor scuff marks, and some very tiny, surface open bubbles.  This really is a nice example of a popular Western whiskey which interestingly enough has the distinctive San Francisco, 1870s to mid-1880s mold engraver "curved R's" only on the "R's" in TRADE and MARK; the rest of them are straight legged ones.  Why?  One sees this now and then on Western made bottles of the same era and the only explanation I can think of is that two different mold engravers worked on those molds.  In any event a very nice bottle with a nice big finish.  SOLD!

 

CUTTER / O.K. WHISKY. / J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON / TRADE ("slugged" on crown) MARK / (barrel with J. H. C.) / C. P. MOORMAN / MANUFACTURER / LOUISVILLE , K. Y.  -  Offered here is another example of the Thomas #41 "slugged on crown" Cutter dating from the mid-1870s to probably early 1880s.  This is the same mold as the one shown above so it also has the reverse embossing - A. P. HOTALING'S / O. K. / CUTTER WHISKY - on the upper body and shoulder. This example is a medium darkish "chocolate" amber with a sloppier glob top (click close-up of the lip/finish to see the applied lip), has a little "whittle" to the front, and is essentially mint.  I can find nothing wrong with it outside of a couple very, very small scuff marks the back...otherwise it has a very nice glossy (likely never polished) glass surface, no staining that I can see, nor chips, cracks, dings, or any post-manufacture "issues."  Would look real nice in the window.   $275

 

J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON. / (crown) / A. P. HOTALING & Co. / SOLE AGENTS  - All that is embossed within a circle (though not a slug plate) on this popular - at least to late 19th century Western drinkers and modern Western bottle collectors! - fifth sized liquor bottle blown and filled in San Francisco.  This version (Thomas #44B with the "T" in AGENTS underneath the "G" in HOTALING) dates from 1883 to 1885 according to the late John Thomas although many think they date back as early as the late 1870s (and I agree based on fragments I've found in Nevada mining camp areas). 

Anyway...this example has a very  crudely applied finish/lip with slop almost all the way around (close-up image of lip) and a bit of a "tip" to the right as shown in the image to the left.  It also has the smooth slightly domed base, 4-piece mold conformation, a smattering of bubbles in the glass, and is embossed with A No 1 on the reverse without the circle.  Glass color is a distinctly of a lighter toned golden amber which is represented well by the images.  The embossing is moderately bold as the images show, but not as bold as the examples than following examples which are in my opinion above average (immediately below) to as good-as-it-gets (two down).  I would actually call this one average for the mold since in my experience of having a number of these as they all tend towards that "flattened" embossing look typical of the pre-mold air venting era.  The bottle is also essentially mint with no chips, cracks, or staining but does appear to have been lightly cleaned.  In any event, this is a very pleasing example in a lighter than average coloration.  $165

 

J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON. / (crown) / A. P. HOTALING & Co. / SOLE AGENTS  - Here is another example from the same mold as the one listed above (Thomas #44B) and also dating from the same era noted above.  This example has a crudely applied finish/lip with slop here and there (close-up image of lip).  It also, of course, has the smooth slightly domed base, 4-piece mold conformation, a smattering of bubbles in the glass including some nice long ones in the neck, and is embossed with A No 1 on the reverse without the circle.  Glass color is a distinctly on the lighter end also...also a gold amber which is represented well by the images and just a tiny bit less light that the example above.  The embossing is fairly bold and above average, as the images show, but not as bold as the "sharp" example listed next.  The bottle is also essentially mint with no chips, cracks, pings or staining and may have been lightly cleaned, i.e., "tumbled."  It does have a light 1" scratch on the lower back that has a small surface "rough spot" (a few mm long and much more narrow) at its lower end, probably from a diggers shovel contact? In any event, this is also a very pleasing example in a lighter than average coloration...great window bottle which is where I've had it for some time and will remain until sold.  $185

 

J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON. / (crown) / A. P. HOTALING & Co. / SOLE AGENTS  - Here is another example (I really like these bottles and have accumulated a few over time) from the same mold as the ones listed above (Thomas #44B) and also dating from the same era...late 1870s to mid-1880s.  This example also has a crudely applied finish/lip with slop here and there (close-up image of lip).  It also, of course, has the smooth slightly domed base, 4-piece mold conformation, a smattering of bubbles in the glass including some nice long ones in the neck, and is embossed boldly with A No 1 on the reverse without the circle.  Glass color is a beautiful light golden color...like Black Hills gold almost...which is represented well by the images and lighter that the example above which is fairly light.  The embossing is VERY bold as the images show with all the "diamond" bumps on the crown showing well making it as bold of embossing as I've ever encountered.  It is very similar to another exceptional example recently (June 2015) sold on eBay by a well known SW Oregon collector.  To my eye, the embossing on my offered example is actually a tiny bit better (the diamond bumps on this one also showing well at the top of the crown where I didn't even know there were diamonds engraved!) than that eBay one though it had a bit more yellow to the glass color (and sold for $431.) The bottle is also essentially mint with no chips, cracks, pings or staining and may (or may not) have been lightly cleaned, i.e., "tumbled."  It does have a some very minor and very small and almost invisible scuff marks in a couple places and there is an in-making, small open bubble on the inside of the upper neck at the interface where the lip was applied to the upper neck. In any event, this is an exceptionally pleasing and esthetic example in a lighter than average coloration with some decent "whittle to the glass.  It is a great window bottle which along with the other examples above (and one very dark one I dug as a teenager) is where I've had it (them) for some time and will remain until sold.  $225

 

OREGON IMPORTING  CO./ WE NEITHER RECTIFY / (O. I. CO. monogram) / NOR COMPOUND / PORTLAND, ORE. - That is all boldly & sharply embossed within a slightly oval to round slug plate (aka "plate mold") on this quart sized cylinder whiskey bottle with straight fluting on the shoulder and lower neck.  According to John Thomas's great book on Oregon liquor bottles this style bottle was called a "Maverick Brandy" which was the name used for this style of liquor bottle by the huge Illinois Glass Company (Alton, IL.) who almost certainly was the producer of this bottle for the Portland company.  A quick check shows an identical one by that name, including the "bumps" at the lower end of the flutes, shown (sans embossing) in that glass company's 1903, 1906, 1908 and 1911 catalogs (I have original examples of all these).  That fits perfectly the history of the company which, according to Thomas, began in 1904 and ran until statewide alcohol Prohibition began in Oregon in 1915.  Isn't the history of these bottles cool!?  The "We neither rectify nor compound" motto was a reference to some liquor bottlers of the era "rectifying and compounding," i.e., cutting, diluting, blending and otherwise adulterating the product in undesirable ways (maybe "snake heads"?).  Not this company!  Anyway, this example is 11.6" tall, clear or colorless glass (the type that would turn amethyst), has a tooled "brandy" lip or finish, and dates during the range noted above.  It was probably was actually used for brandy, though without an original label it is impossible to tell.  In my experience these clear examples are scarcer than the amber versions and more likely to be stained.  This specimen is in great condition with no cracks, chips, pings, dings, or other post-production damage; it just has some widely scattered, light, water staining on the inside back which is non-detracting...the outside is unstained and nice.  Also some nice bubbles in the glass and minor crudeness befitting a later, mouth-blown bottle.  Another ex-Bob Barnett bottle I acquired a long time ago.  $50

 

OREGON IMPORTING  CO./ WE NEITHER RECTIFY / (O. I. CO. monogram) / NOR COMPOUND / PORTLAND, ORE. - Here is the light-ish amber example of the same cylinder quart whiskey bottle that was fully described above...and blown in the same mold even though the embossing is lighter than the very bold clear/colorless example.  However, it is of moderate boldness and very easy to read (see enlargement of close-up of embossing).  The color is a light-ish amber with a golden tone to it; the images show it pretty well though in real-life it is a bit brighter.  This example is dead mint as far as I can see looking it over several times, with no chips, cracks, flea-bites, scuffing, staining, or anything post-manufacture.  A very nice example of one of a relatively small universe of Western fancy (fluted or swirled) shoulder liquor cylinders...and one of only two from Portland to my recollection (the other being the Remington swirl shoulder cylinder).  $60

Note: I also have a dark amber example of this bottle and mold  - with some remnants of the original label - which I will be listing in the future I believe.  If interested in it now, please inquire.

 

JESSE MOORE & Co. LOUISVILLE / G. H. MOORE OLD BOURBON & RYE / MOORE, HUNT & Co. / SOLE AGENTS  - Offered here is a very nice example of one of the more popular (affordable) glob top Western "picture" cylinder fifths - the "picture" on this being the elk antlers.  Sure, an amber, glob top Gold Dust Bourbon with the horse would be more "popular" with Western cylinder collectors...but WAY less affordable.  These bottles were made in San Francisco as indicated by the curved "R"s in the embossing pattern - the well known product of an unknown mold engraver working in the Bay Area from about 1870 to the mid-1880s.  According to the late John Thomas's last book "Whiskey Bottles of the Old West" (2002), these glob top cylinders were made between about 1876 and 1885.  This example does have the early, not often encountered (limited period of use), round "blob" type air venting marking between the tips of the antlers (and in a similar position on the otherwise unembossed reverse) making it towards the end of that noted period, i.e., 1883 to 1885. 

An interesting observation of the non-air vented versus the shoulder "blob" air vented, glob top cylinders is that upon close inspection of the embossing it obvious that they were made in the same mold!  I see them for sale differentiated as though they were a different mold, but in fact - at least in the observations of the ones I've had - the air venting was simply added to the original mold when such was deemed to be useful in assisting the blower in producing better embossed bottles faster.  That is the case here comparing it to the keeper example I have that has no air venting - same mold.  This offered example is also like what Thomas noted:"The very early ones are often light yellow-amber with the flattened kick-up in the base."  Check on both counts - color and base conformation. 

Anyway, this example is pretty well embossed and in near mint condition; it may (or may not) have been lightly cleaned...I can't tell for sure.  The glob top has some nice spill over - click close-up of the glob top and neck to see such.   Click close-up of the lower portion of the embossing to see such.  This example also has a nice smattering of seed bubbles along with a long stretchy one in the neck in addition to surface stretch markings.  The only "issues" are a small pinhead sized peck mark on the back of the neck (shows in close-up image of neck), an extremely hard to find and very tiny annealing "check" on the back, and the tiniest spots of faint scuffing on the back body.  Otherwise the bottle is clean, bright with no cracks, staining or other issues.  Nice example that is currently one of my window bottles...but could be yours!  $195

 

W. J. VAN SCHUYVER / & (crown and shield with V monogram) Co / PORTLAND - That embossing is inside an embossed square and is the oldest of the many Van Schuyver mold varieties.  It is also one of two (maybe three) of the Van Schuyver cylinders that is a true slug plate; more on that below.  These bottles contained a pretty popular product - Cyrus Noble Whiskey - and span a pretty wide time frame from at least the late 1880s to Oregon's "early" Prohibition in 1915.  This Portland based company was connected with the Lilienthal & Crown Distillery Companies (San Francisco) since the Van Schuyver bottles with inside threads come with hard rubber stoppers that are embossed either with LILIENTHAL & CO (and their "L in a shield below a crown" monogram which this example has), embossed with CROWN DISTILLERIES COMPANY (and the "CDCo. in a shield below a crown" monogram) or just a six pointed star and no name. 

In retirement I've been accumulating and studying (too much free time...ha!) the different molds used for this company's cylinder fifths.  (I've not studied the rectangular "Baltimore Oval" style bottles; maybe someday.)  This example was blown in what I've determined was the first mold used for producing this company's bottles...or at least the same "slug" plate was used as with the earliest applied lip examples.  (Need to look at more glob top examples to make sure.)  I've recorded (so far) ten different mold variations sure used during the time span noted for the company.  This and one other mold being the only true plate molds.  Upon close inspection all the rest of the molds are not plate molds, but instead, are full face proprietary molds with an engraved square box emulating a slug plate perimeter around the embossing.  This true plate mold example and the other couple "PORTLAND" (no OR. or ORE.) molds were likely used by the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works (a reasonable assumption) as the conformation and "look" of the bottles is about identical...just different molds.  Someday I'll figure it all out and write an article on it...

In any event, this example has some whittling in the body, bubbles in the glass, neck stretch marks, period style domed base, and a great glossy surface...an all around very nice specimen dating from the early 1890s I would estimate.  The height (without stopper) is 11.75" and the color is a rich, bright medium amber; the images show the color well to my eye.  The condition is near mint with no chips, cracks, or staining...and very little wear at all.  Great example of a Northwest favorite - yesterday and today!   $60

 

Bitters & Medicinal
 

BARKER'S CELERY COLA - PHIL BLUMAUER / PORTLAND, ORE. - BARKER'S CELERY KOLA - This is embossed on three sunken panels  (4th not embossed or sunken) on this extremely rare "tonic" or "bitters" type bottle from Portland, OR.  I've had this bottle for about 25 years and have never heard of another until earlier this year when another was dug in SW Oregon (I think).   The bottle is just under 10" tall, smooth square indented base with no embossing, tooled "brandy" style finish, and is an interesting and very beautiful shade of amber glass - sort of a medium golden reddish amber.  The images show it pretty well.  (Note: The bottle doesn't tip at all as the images would seem to indicate.)

There were an assortment of Blumauer's doing business in Portland in the late 19th century, including L. Blumauer who was a druggist beginning in the 1870s and Solomon Blumauer who was a liquor dealer in the late 1890s to Oregon Prohibition in 1915.  I assume that Phil was related but have no idea how it fits in precisely, though I believe he was a druggist during the same era.  This bottle appears to date from the 1890s given its manufacturing features but could be late 1880s. 

Its condition is excellent with no chips, cracks, or other post manufacturing physical damage.  It does have a few wisps of very light haze here and there on the outside and inside as well as a narrow, dark contents sediment line inside ringing two corners vertically; caused from having been laying on its side prior to apparently being dug (this shows in one of the images).  The sediment looks like it could be removed but I never tried.  I picked this bottle up at an auction back in the late 1980s so do not know its precise provenance.  It was a surprise to me as I'd never heard of it.  In any event here is a chance to get one of the rarest of the Oregon amber "squares" as I'm doing a little paring down of the collection.  $295

 

DR HENRY.S / WORLD'S TONIC - & / BLOOD PURFIFYER. - This is a very nice example of what is reported to be a Western blown tonic bottle and possibly related to the California Dr. Henry's products (e.g., Dr. Henry's Sarsaparilla).  It has the deep blue aqua color typical of the 1870s and 1880s products blown at the SF&PGW (or predecessors) and have been reported to be found in the West, though some seem to come from back east also.  The shape, size and embossing pattern was probably chosen to emulate the way more popular "Dr. McClean's Strenghtening Cordial & Blood Purifier" though the mold engraver (or Dr. Henry?) had a problem correctly spelling purifier choosing to spell it "Purifyer" to the delight of modern bottle collectors.  Unlike the McLean's product, this bottle has the noted embossing spread over both sides of the body...once again to the delight of collectors. 

In any event, this example is 9.2" tall, "flask" shaped body (over 4" wide and 2" thick), blown in a post-base mold, lacking evidence of body air venting although boldly embossed, and a crudely applied double ring lip or finish with an appearance and manufacturing signature dating it to the 1870s.  The glass is, as noted, a rich blue aqua with a nice assortment of bubbles in the glass and a bit of other crudeness to the body.  Condition is near mint with no issues besides one surface open bubble at the heel that has no depth at all; it appears to have been professionally cleaned to my eye.  Great example of a very rare tonic bottle that I've seen a couple examples sell for $500 to $600 the past couple years.  This example is well priced at $295.

 

Bark-Root Tonic - Celro-Kola Co., Portland, Ore. (label only) -  This is an early machine-made labeled tonic bottle that has a great original-to-this-bottle label as noted, which was a "mild laxative averaging 25% alcohol."  This is a somewhat later product of the Celro-Kola Co. of Portland, Oregon.  There are at least two earlier embossed versions of this bottle dating from the 1900 to 1910s era - one mouth-blown, one machine-made.  (I have examples of both which I may offer for sale in the near future.)  This example has the one label on the side as shown with the other three sides not labeled nor embossed.  Several of these machine-made labeled examples were found, if I remember the story correctly, in an old house in Washington many years ago.  I've seen a couple since (a recent one sold on eBay for $175 or so!) though they are a rare bottle.  this example is in mint condition with the original cork and about 99% of the label which only has some mild chipping along the edges and equally mild discoloring in a few spots.  (Note: bottle sits straight up and is not tilted like the image shows; my poor camera work.)  The base has the "IPG in a triangle" makers marking in the center of the base, used by the Illinois Pacific Glass Company, San Francisco, CA. which dates it to the late 1910s to early 1920s most likely, meaning this was probably one of "those" legal medicines that one could still purchase during National Prohibition without getting thrown in jail!  Neat labeled medicinal tonic and Western manufactured bottle.  $65

 

DR COOPER'S / SARSAPARILLA / WOODARD, CLARKE & CO / PORTLAND, ORE. - One of the more exciting finds when I was a teenager (late 1960s) digging in the urban renewal areas of Portland, OR. was finding one of these rare Portland bottles - the only embossed sarsaparilla bottle from Oregon (or NW) I believe.  Unfortunately, that original find got away though I've had this one - which I purchased later - for many years.  They just don't come along often but it is time to move this one on also...just not enough room for everything.  This big medicine bottle is of a bluish aqua glass, 10" tall, indented body panels on all four sides (just the front embossed), smooth base with indented circular center (post base mold conformation), and dating from around 1895 to 1905 I would guess.  Woodard, Clarke & Co. was a major NW druggist and medical supply firm which must have been somehow connected to the Clarke-Woodward Drug Co. (see the CLA-WOOD MALT TONIC bottle listed later on this page) which was also in Portland; the "w" in Woodward being a misspelling of Woodard?  I don't know the history of this company though I do know there were C. H. WOODARD embossed drug bottles that dated back at least into the 1870s.  The condition of this bottle is very good - near mint I would call it - with no chips, cracks, dings or significant staining.  There are some wisps of very, very faint haze here and there though largely the back panel on the outside and the shoulders on the inside; probably a scuff or two somewhere though I can't find any of note.  Hard to find Oregon medicine bottle of good size.  $275

 

AFRICAN / STOMACH / BITTERS - This is embossed horizontally on this neat, interestingly named, Western bitters produced by the Spruance, Stanley & Co. of San Francisco.  This example is from the mold without the company name embossed and dates from the early 1880s, i.e., maybe as early as 1881 or 1882 and as late as 1885.  How do I deduce that?  Well, it has one small single mold air venting mark on the shoulder on both sides, indicating it isn't probably earlier than around 1880 or 1881, it has an applied lip/finish typical of no later than the mid-1880s, and it has the "curved R's" of the Bay Area mold engraver that was active from the early 1870s to maybe as late as 1885 (based on other bottles with these distinctive "R's").  In any event, this example is 9.5" tall, has a very crudely applied "oil" finish or lip, smooth base, and was blown in a four-piece mold it appears.  The color is a bright medium golden amber and the glass has crudeness in the form of a bit of "whittle" waviness, straw marks, neck stretch marks and scattered bubbles.  The bottle appears sparking mint and to have been never professionally cleaned.  No real issues at all besides a scuff here and there; no staining, chips, flashes, cracks or other post manufacturing problems.  A very nice, clean, crude highly esthetic example (an almost identical one recently sold on eBay for over $400)!  $175

 

JOYS - SARSAPARILLA - THE / EDWIN W. JOY CO. / SAN FRANCISCO - I sold one of these some time back, but found another in box I didn't know I had.  The embossing is scattered on three sides of this rectangular medicine bottle from California; the remaining (back) side is a typical plain, indented label panel.  Actually, all of the sides are indented and the embossing is bold and distinct - sometimes these are not that boldly embossed in my experience.  (For a better view of what both side panels embossing looks like, see the previously sold example images in the "sold" section below.)  This is also a very nice example in a "Western" bluish aqua, tooled single collar ("patent" finish), smooth slightly indented base, almost 9" tall, ca. 1880s to 1890s.  A scarce sarsaparilla from the West which didn't produce very many embossed sarsaparilla bottles it seems (and most of those are quite rare).  Condition is near mint with no chips, cracks, overt staining or other post-production damage besides a tiny "flea bite" on the middle of the outside edge of the back, unembossed panel and a little bit of very faint haze inside primarily in the lower back and one side panel; the outside is virtually spotless.  This example also has some body crudeness and bubbles in the glass adding to its visual appeal.  It is what I would call "about mint" and is also a very nice example - at least as good as the sold one.  $55

NOTE: I also have another example that is identical - a nice blue aqua (just a tiny bit less blue than the example to the right) - but is full of hundreds of seed bottles and has nice rude, wavy glass, stretch marks in the glass, and is a very nice example.  It is also in essentially mint condition but does have a couple small almost invisible "flashes" at the edge of the base; pictures on request if desired.  A beautiful example and priced accordingly given the small flashes.   $35

 

DAMIANA BITTERS / BAJA CALIFORNIA - This is embossed vertically on two sides of this tall "fifth" or "sixth" sized Western Bitters bottles from San Francisco, CA.  11 1/4" tall, tooled "brandy" finish (with some of the original foil wrapper still remaining), bluish aqua in color, ca. 1890s.  Click Baja California embossed side to see such.  A nice example of an unusual shaped bitters that began production in the 1870s and continued until about the turn-of-the-century.  This is the variant without "Lewis Hess - Manfr'r" on the shoulder and the last of the three molds to be used.  This bitters (and the Damiana herb in general) was thought to be a sexual stimulant...  Condition is about mint with just a few light scratches and no chips, cracks, or staining.  Has a bit of body crudeness in the form of bubbles - including some neat teardrop ones - and stretch marks.  $50

 

C. L. WILHELM / SAN FRANCISCO - This is a fairly rare and early Western citrate of magnesia bottle of which I don't know anything of the specific history of the company/druggist.  The noted embossing is within a round "slug plate" as shown in the images.  The base is not embossed, the lip is a tooled double ring (click close-up of the shoulder, neck, and finish/lip to see such), and it has the appearance of dating from the 1870s I would estimate, possibly early 1880s.  Whitall, Tatum & Co. is likely the producer of this bottle.  That company was a pioneer in the use of plates on druggist type bottles including these type citrate of magnesia bottles as shown in their 1880 catalog which was reprinted back in the 1970s.  However, this bottle could also have been made by the San Francisco or Pacific Glass Works (or the combined company) - a fact impossible to determine since it has no makers marking.  Condition of this bottle is about mint with just a small flash or bruise on the inside edge of the lip;  the bottle appears to have been professionally cleaned.  This bottle was also used for illustrating my Historic Bottle Website.   $25

 

Wm. PFUNDER'S / OREGON / No 7132 / (baby's face with TRADE MARK and OMNIS PROSINT) / REGISTERED / MARCH 23rd, 1879 / BLOOD / PURIFIER / Wm. PFUNDER & CO / PORTLAND, ORE - All this is embossed within an arched plate (aka "slug plate") on a fine example of a popular medicine bottle from...Oregon, of course.  This example is probably the fourth or fifth mold used to put up this product, dating from the 1890s most likely. (I'm trying to collect an example of each different mold for this bottle and have identified 5 different molds so far...including two without the "Registered" that are different molds, but the same embossing plate!)  It is 7.5" tall, a medium amber with a but of a reddish hue (see image), smooth base (embossed with "320"), tooled "club sauce" type lip or finish.  Condition of this offering is near mint with no chips, cracks or significant staining...just a few very light wisps of the latter which is very unobtrusive.  Nice example of one of the most distinctive Oregon bottles.   SOLD!

 

JOYNER  / UNITED DRUG CO. (in a shield) / TRADE MARK / SPOKANE / U.S.A. - This is a scarce druggist bottle from Spokane, WA. that is quite rare with the original label and string around the neck that probably had some tag attached at some point.  Click close-up of the embossing to see such.  This 7 3/8" tall (12 oz.) bottle from the early 20th century has a tooled, unusual two-part lip or finish - what is called the "reinforced extract" or "collared ring" depending on what reference is used.  It also has a large majority of the original label (see image) which notes that it contained "Ideal Blood Mixture and Tonic" with an alcohol level of 20%; it also notes all the maladies it would treat - from acne to "malarial poison."  The bottle is also embossed just above the label with "12 OZ.", has a smooth base, clear or colorless glass and is in mint condition with no chips, cracks, staining or other issues...reflecting it having never been buried.  It does have a bit of dirt inside which would certainly wash out easily, though I did not since I didn't want to possibly disturb the label integrity.  This bottle was acquired for use in helping illustrate some concepts on the Historic Bottle WebsiteNice item with bold embossing and a pretty nice original label.  $25

 

DR. SLACK'S / MEXICAN / CATARRH REMEDY / CLAYTON, N. MEX. - Here is a patent medicine bottle from a small town (current pop. less than 3000) located in the NE corner of New Mexico.  How many actual patent or proprietary medicine bottles have you seen from the entire state of New Mexico?  I know of no other types, but also know of no book on New Mexico bottles (besides sodas) so don't have much to go on.  I've seen a few of these Dr. Slack's bottles on the internet over the past decade, but they still seem to be a very scarce or rare bottle.  It has a tooled rounded "bead" lip or finish, is almost 6" tall, smooth base, colorless/clear glass with a slight amethyst tint and some bubbles in the glass, and appears to date from the early 1900s as there is ample mold air venting in evidence on the shoulders and base.  Condition of this one is comparatively quite good (the few examples I remember were quite stained, some with damage) with some moderate, internal white staining - which is pretty even and not overly distracting - and some swirly mild etching lines on the outside; otherwise no chips, cracks, flea bites, or other post production damage.  It seems like someone dug a few of these at one point - probably in or near Clayton - and they reacted to the alkaline soils probably typical of this high (5000') desert area.  $95

(NOTE:  Recently an article was published on these bottles in the FOHBC's Bottles & Extras magazine [Nov.-Dec. 2013] detailing some fascinating history about Dr. John C. Slack [1856-1917] who apparently produced this medicine from about 1897 into the early 1900s sometime - so this is a New Mexico Territory era bottle.  He was a real doctor - not a fake "medicine wagon" type - and had the additional claim to fame as having been the doctor to pronounce dead the famous Southwestern bank and train robber "Black Jack" Tom Ketchum in 1901 after his execution by hanging.  As part of that "honor" he also had to sew Black Jack's head back on after his hanging which - due to an improper, non-stretching rope - decapitated Black Jack when the trap door sprang and the rope fully extended!  Black Jack Ketchum was one of the "Hole In The Wall Gang" members along with Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch.  Cool history, eh?!)

 

DR. HENLEY'S / WILD GRAPE ROOT / IXL (in an oval) / BITTERS - These large (at least a quart in capacity) Western bitters bottles are quite popular with collectors since they are...large...have great embossing and found in a myriad of colors.  A very popular product, these bottles are found all over the West from the mining camps of Utah, Nevada, and Montana to the big cities of the day - San Francisco, Portland, Sacramento.  In my experience visiting lots of the mining camps and ghost towns of the West, it is a rare location where one does NOT find fragments of an IXL - it was that popular.  This example is just over 12" tall, a rich "San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works" blue-aqua color (where it was made), the usual domed base, and a very crudely applied "champagne" style banded finish (click on lip image to the left to enlarge).  This example probably dates from the late 1870s to early 1880s since it fairly crude (stretch marks, bubbles), not air vented resulting in the flattened embossing, and from a mold that lacks the distinctive curved "R" of the earlier mold(s).  This example is near mint with no chips, cracks, staining, or repairs - only some light scratching or scuffing here and there.  As is a frequent case, the embossing is lightly rendered but all easily readable; click on embossing close-up #1 & embossing close-up #2 to see such though in real life it is a bit more distinct than the image shows.  As is fairly typical with these lighter embossed IXL's, the lightest of the embossing is in the middle of the pattern (GRAPE ROOT & IXL and oval)  though even that part of the embossing is quite readable with the rest of the embossing a better.  All around a great condition bottle with a nice deep aqua coloration though sub-standard embossing; priced accordingly.  $100

 

(LCE monogram) SUMPTER DRUG CO. (in banner) / L. C. EDWARDS, PROP. / SUMPTER, ORE. - This is embossed on this scarce druggist bottle from a very small town in NE Oregon.  Also one of - or the only? - druggist bottle I know of from a true, 19th century Oregon mining camp.  I don't know anything about the history of Mr. Edwards drugstore, but the bottle is embossed on the base with PARIS which indicates the bottle was made by Dean, Foster & Co. - a Boston, MA. glass maker.  The "Paris Square Prescription" was a proprietary line that the company apparently produced only between 1901 and about 1904...pegging the date of these bottles down pretty narrowly.   (Information on the history of that glass company, its predecessors, and the Paris style prescription bottle is available on my Historic Bottle Website at this link:  http://www.sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/DeanFoster.pdf )

This example is 4.75" tall (same size as all the ones I've seen, but believe it was made in a few other sizes?), colorless/clear glass, with a tooled prescription finish or lip.  It is in about perfect condition except for some variable light to moderate internal and a bit of external content/water staining.  There is a very tiny rough wear spot on one back upper corner (I think it is just a very, very tiny open bubble) but otherwise the bottle is free of any chips or cracks.  Nice example and fairly hard to come by these days...and a key bottle if one is putting together a collection of druggist bottles from different Oregon towns, which seems to be popular.  I've had this one for at least 45 years...time to pass it on.  $85

 

UNDERWOOD PHARMACY / KLAMATH FALLS, OREGON - This is all embossed in a typical plate mold pharmacy bottle from the early 1900s...and all in italics/script, which was really an embossing style that saw little use prior to about 1900 in my experience.  Same is true for druggist bottles with the graduation markings vertically along both sides of the front panel (ounces on one side and cc's on the other) - an almost totally post-1900 feature on druggist bottles.  This is a moderately large 6 oz. druggist bottle (has the stylized "3" with "vi" after it at the top of the front panel) that is 6" tall, has an oval indented smooth and unembossed base, a tooled "prescription" style finish (could also be called a "flare" finish), and is made from the typical colorless or clear glass with a slight pinkish tint from the use of manganese dioxide as the decolorizing agent in the glass mix.  This bottle probably dates from the 1910s I would guess, though I don't have any information on the company itself, except it was in business for a long time according to people around here that I've talked to.  Condition of this nice bottle from the area I live here is near mint with no chips, cracks or staining, nice glossy glass inside and out with maybe just a few wisps of dirt inside.  I collect Klamath Falls bottles (a very small universe of bottles!) and wouldn't be selling this except it is a duplicate I picked up somewhere thinking it was a different size...and it wasn't.  $25

 

COMPLIMENTS OF / MORGAN / & / BREHAUT / COTTAGE GROVE, ORE. - All that is embossed inside the oval  "plate" of this little, rarely encountered, dose glass from a (still) small town in Oregon located south of Eugene, OR.  It has the usual dose markings embossed on the reverse as well as the commonly encountered base embossing of - W. T. CO. / AL / U. S. A.  That embossing indicates manufacture by Whitall Tatum & Co.  who was a large producer of druggist bottles and other druggist purveyed wares during the last few decades of the 19th century until the 1930s when they were absorbed into another glass company.  (For a history of the company and its markings, see this article on my other educational Historic Bottle Website: http://www.sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/WTandCo_BLockhart.pdf )  These druggist dose glasses were primarily made by Whitall Tatum (New Jersey bottle & glass producer) who provided embossed ones to thousands of druggists across the country beginning in the 1880s sometime and lasting until the early 1920s (at least).   Of interest, this druggist also used an embossed "picture" druggist bottle with the unusual embossing of the rear end of a house cat walking away.  Why?  Who knows, but it was made by W. T. Co. also.  Needless to say, the druggist bottles are somewhat desired due to the strange graphic which I've never seen on any other druggist; the usual "picture" druggist has a mortar & pestle though a large array of other graphics can be found.  This dose glass is the usual shape and size (~2" tall), is of colorless glass (virtually all are), and has no chips, cracks or other damage.  It does have some faint content (buried at some point?) staining on the inside (left side) which can be seen barely in the enlarged image in the lower left corner.  Minor issue, but is there...and otherwise if a very nice "go-with" for the medicine or Oregon bottle collector.  $100

The following three listings are a small assortment of Baker, Oregon druggist bottles.  Seems there was a competition between druggists in this small town in regards to having embossed bottles in the early 1900s:

GRACE & BODINSON / DRUG CO. / BAKER, OREGON - Here is a cool, smallish (3 ounce capacity; 5.1" tall)  druggist bottle from a small town in eastern Oregon.  This bottle is particularly interesting - and the reason I acquired it years ago - because it not only has the original prescription label (Potass. Acetate) but is hand dated by the druggist as being filled May 26, 1915!  This is the original as filled and sold in 1915 label, not something pasted on in later years to enhance the bottle (like so many I see on eBay these days).  Bottle used for and pictured on my Historic Bottle Website.

According to Wikipedia - "In medicine, potassium acetate is used as part of replacement protocols in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis because of its ability to break down into bicarbonate and help neutralize the acidotic state."  Not sure what that all means, but sounds like it is a treatment for some symptom of diabetes; what it was used for in 1915 one can only speculate on.  In any event this bottle is in perfectly mint condition with no staining, chips, cracks, etc....and the original cork; the label is 100% intact with only some mild soiling.  The glass has a very slight amethyst tint to it.  The base is also embossed with BLUE RIBBON, which was a trademarked prescription druggist bottle style produced by the Standard Glass Company (Marion, Indiana) between 1908 and the 1920s.  (The end date is unknown though this marking is only found on mouth-blown prescription bottles which were made by many bottle companies into the early 1920s; the glass company disappeared in the early parts of the Great Depression.)  It has the embossed graduation markings on the sides of the embossing plate side, scalloped/fluted shoulders, and is really just a neat early 20th century druggist bottle.  Also helps that it is a fairly scarce Eastern Oregon bottle, made very rare with the original label.  $40

 

LEVINGER DRUG CO. / WE NEVER SUBSTITUTE (in a banner) / BAKER, ORE. -    This is a nice, medium size (6 oz. or so) druggist from the small town of Baker, Oregon.   The base is also embossed faintly with C. L. G. CO.  and the number "4" (I think) which indicates manufacture by the Carr-Lowrey Glass Company - a long lived bottle making company in Baltimore, MD. that specialized in prescription bottles.  (For the complete story on this company see my educational Historic Bottle Website for the article; it is at this link:  http://www.sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/CarrLowreyGlassCo.pdf )

I don't know anything about the history of this druggist (or any of the Baker druggists listed) but the bottle dates from the 1900 to 1915 era based on the design which was called the Paris Square Prescription by some other glass companies.  I guess the company felt the need to have a different "We Never..." type motto to compete with the nearby Muegge Druggist, in this case they didn't substitute...apparently substituting something not good for something more good? 

This bottle is 6.3" tall, has a typical tooled prescription style finish or lip, and of a colorless glass as shown in the image.  It is also in about perfect condition with no chips, cracks, or visible scratching; it just has the very lightest of internal haze which is hard to see.  Another nice eastern Oregon druggist for your Oregon State drugstore collection!  $25

 

"WE NEVER SLEEP" / MUEGGE "THE DRUGGIST" / BAKER, ORE. -  Also each is embossed with MUEGGE'S horizontally on the upper back side.  Here is a set 3 of the Muegge druggist bottles!  A familiar and very popular bottle in and out of Oregon because of it's intensely brilliant emerald green color, i.e., "7-Up green."  As a set these are exceptional window bottles! I've heard that there are allegedly something like 6 different sizes of these colorful prescription bottles, though personally I've never seen any size outside of these three sizes, i.e., 12 oz., 6 oz, and 3 oz. 

The offered bottles are 8", 6 1/2", and 5" tall, have the standard tooled "prescription" finish, smooth base (embossed C. L. G. CO. for the Carr-Lowrey Glass Company - a bottle making company that specialized in prescription bottles - especially colored ones - during the very early 20th century), and date ca. 1905-1915.  All three sizes are embossed identically except for different letters on the base, i.e., "A" on the large example and "B" on the two smaller sizes.  Easily the rarest of these sizes is the large one with several dozen of the smaller ones around for every 12 oz. example.  Thus, they sell individually for several times the price of their smaller brethren .  Condition of all three is essentially mint - I can find no problems at all - with shiny, perfect glass, no staining, chips, cracks, nicks, or anything.  These bottles (like virtually all of them) were never buried I believe and are pristine examples of a three-some of bottles that is harder to put together.  $3oo

 

HERMAN W. PAULING / CONDON, ORE. - A rare druggist bottle from a very small (still less than 700 people) eastern Oregon town of Condon, which is located in the north central portion of the state.  Not only rare, but with exceptional history behind it as Herman W. Pauling was the father of the famous, two-time Nobel Prize winning (Chemistry and Peace) Linus Pauling!  He is among the most famous people ever born in Oregon. Here is a excerpt from Wikipedia about this:

(Linus) Pauling was born in Portland, Oregon, the first-born child of Herman Henry William Pauling (18761910) and Lucy Isabelle "Belle" Darling (18811926). He was named "Linus Carl", in honor of Lucy's father, Linus, and Herman's father, Carl.

In 1901, after his sister Pauline was born, Pauling's parents decided to move out of Portland, to find more affordable and spacious living quarters than their one-room apartment. Lucy stayed with her husband's parents in Lake Oswego until Herman brought the family to Salem, where he worked briefly as a traveling salesman for the Skidmore Drug Company. Within a year of Lucile's birth in 1904, Herman Pauling moved his family to Oswego, where he opened his own drugstore. He moved his family to Condon, Oregon in 1905. By 1906, Herman Pauling was suffering from recurrent abdominal pain. He died of a perforated ulcer on June 11, 1910, leaving Lucy to care for Linus, Lucile and Pauline.  (Emphasis mine)

Well, is that cool or what?!  Other information I could find indicates that the Pauling family moved back to Portland by late 1909 making it appear that Herman only operated as a druggist from sometime in 1905 until late 1909...giving a pretty narrow date range for the manufacture of this bottle.  Like some of the Baker druggist bottles listed above, this bottle was made by the Carr-Lowrey Glass Company - a long lived bottle making company in Baltimore, MD. that specialized in prescription bottles.  (For the complete story on this company see my educational Historic Bottle Website for the article; it is at this link:  http://www.sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/CarrLowreyGlassCo.pdf )  Embossed on the base is C. L. G. CO. / 2 - the manufacturers marking.

This example is the small, 1 ounce capacity version with a tooled prescription finish or lip.  The condition is near mint with just a light coating of internal content or water staining which isn't too distracting to my eye.  No chips, cracks or other damage.  I have no idea where I originally acquired this historic bottle but am willing to pass it on...though it isn't too cheap.  $195

 

Soda/Mineral Water & Beers

 

HAAS BRO'S / NATURAL / MINERAL WATER - NAPA / SODA - This is one (the first I believe) of a relatively large grouping of various "Napa Soda" bottles used by an assortment of companies over many decades utilizing the (still) famous spring waters in what is now more regarded as one of the premier wine growing regions in the world.  These bottles date from 1873 when a trade mark for "Napa Soda" was applied for by the David Haas.  They were probably not made after that time (1873 to 1874) as - according to the Markota's wonderful book on Western blob sodas - a Col. John P. Jackson assumed the ownership of the Napa Soda Springs in 1873 or 1874 building a large health resort. 

These soda bottles do come in aqua (most common), lime green and cobalt/sapphire blue (both much less common) this being a light cobalt or medium/dark sapphire, depending on ones interpretation.  The images show the color well.  It has an applied blob lip or finish (like all of them), has a smooth base (none are pontiled - too late of manufacture), and were likely blown at either the Pacific or San Francisco Glass Works.  The thick blue glass is very whittled and there are some nice stretched out bubbles in the glass.  Condition is about mint (possibly cleaned?) with some light wear on high points of the body and embossing in a few places from re-use, though it has no chips, cracks, flashes in the glass. I also don't see any "ping" marks on the body which are sometimes common with reused soda bottles.  Take a look at the enlargements of the two images.  Nice example!  $275

 

J. N. GERDES / S. F. - MINERAL / WATER - That is embossed on opposite sides (embossing split on two panels each on both sides as images show) of this pair of nice, 1870s era San Francisco mineral waters in a rare - for the West - 8 sided configuration.  Being offered here separately or together, these were both blown in the same mold, certainly by a San Francisco glass works sometime between 1873 and 1877 according to the Markota's great book on Western blob soda bottles.  So these were made either at the San Francisco Glass Works or the Pacific Glass Works...or at the combined San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works if blown after their merging in 1875 or 1876 (depending on what source you reference).  John N. Gerdes was the proprietor of the San Francisco Soda Works during the noted time period, so these bottle were used by that company during (and possibly a bit after) John Gerdes ownership. 

The bottles have the distinctive curved "R's" made by the still yet unknown mold maker or engraver doing work on some of the most legendary bottles made in the West from about 1870 to the mid-1880s. To my knowledge there was only one mold used for the blowing of the scarce bottles and all have applied blob lips or finishes.  This pair is in better than average condition for these bottles and described separately here. 

The greenish aqua bottle with the original cork securing fitting has a little bit of spotty wear here and there, but no staining and appears to have never been professionally cleaned.  As with all of these bottles I've seen, there is some ground wear right at the heel of the bottle on the small lowermost "tip" of most/all of the panel points; apparently due to case wear from the bottles inevitable being reused many times.  As is also typical, there is a small nick on one of the reverse panel edges (right below the curved "R" leg in WATER) that is about 4mm by 3 mm in size with a bit of depth.  (It is visible in the enlarged version of the second image to the left).  Otherwise the glass is largely shiny and clean with very minor wear and not other chips, no cracks or other post-manufacturing damage.  $90

The light blue green (deep "fire aqua" to Western collectors) example to the right in the images is also very nice with the same wear at the lower panel corners.  It has been professionally cleaned it appears and has a minor bit of "ground" wear here and there on the body and lip but it is limited and non-distracting to my eye.  There are also a few (3 I can see) very small (much smaller than the small nick noted for the first bottle) edge nicks or pinprick chips on the side panel edges.  As the images show this example has very nice color (the other is no slacker!) and displays very nicely.  SOLD!

 

PORTLAND / TRADE MARK / (phoenix bird rising from the ashes) / SODA WORKS P. O. - There is an array of Portland (P. O. = Portland, Oregon) embossed soda bottles that were used by the same basic soda manufacturer, but with different owners, from the 1870s to the 1930s.  In fact, this soda works traces it roots back to Territorial Oregon in the 1850s when first founded by Dekum & Bickel in 1856!  The embossed bottles of interest and importance to bottle collectors begin with the Cottle & Post blob sodas - the beautiful blue green soda at the top of this section.  In 1883, this same soda company was owned and operated by Northrop & Sturgis who produced this bottle.  In fact, the base is embossed with NORTHRUP & STURGIS

I've made a casual study of the entire sequence of mouth-blown bottles from this outfit (1883 to 1911 according to Ron Fowler's great book on Oregon sodas!) and this bottle is certainly from the second (possibly third) mold used by the company in the 1880s, probably starting about 1884 or 1885 and moving to a second (or third) similar mold in the late 1880s.  (The first bottle used by N&S, apparently for a very short time, was the fairly elusive blob soda Portland Soda Works bottle.  There was also possibly an earlier Hutchinson soda listed by Ron, but I've yet to see one.)  How do I know this is the first (second?) Hutchinson mold?  Because I've bottles from this mold  in both an applied and tooled blob finish; this example being the tooled finish.  Of additional interest (I'm getting into this now!) is that even though both the applied and tooled bottles were certainly made in the same mold, at the time the glass company that produced the bottles (almost certainly the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works) switched to tooled finishing they also shoulder air vented (i.e., drilled small holes) the front and back halves of the mold since the applied ones do not (in my experience) have the air venting.  Cool, eh? 

Anyway, this bottle is a nice blue aqua typical of the SF&PGW bottles of the era and is essentially mint (don't believe it has ever been cleaned, but not sure) with virtually no visible staining inside or out, no chips or cracks or other issues with the exception of a few very small, light scuffs on the outside and a bit of Hutchinson stopper induced wear on the inside of the lip; typical of Hutchinson's used more than once.  Nice example, with good embossing, some decent crudity to the finish, shoulder and body and in better than average condition.  $45

 

EAST SIDE BOTTLING CO. / PORTLAND / ORE. - This is a pretty rare (first I've seen or had) soda bottle from East Portland (east of the Willamette River) which was at one point a separate city in competition with Portland (west of the river).  Yes, it is "just" a crown top soda, but is hand blown (aka "mouth blown") and is a genre of Oregon mouth-blown bottles that have yet to be discovered...maybe?  The company was, according to period business directories operating for only one year - 1912.  This according to Ron Fowler's great book on Oregon soda bottles.  It was located in the "Brentwood Addition" (there were lots of "additions" in that area in the 1890s to 1920s) at the NW corner of Cooper and Spring Avenue.  This bottle has a hand tooled crown finish, is embossed in a "slug plate" (really a "plate mold" according to bottle makers), and is a nice greenish aqua color. 

It is also embossed at the reverse heel with O - S  A B Co. What does that mean?  Well, it indicates that the bottle was produced by the American Bottle Company (various plants in the Midwest).  More specially the "0" is a certain date code for 1910 and the "S" the plant code for the companies Streator, IL. plant; the old Streator Bottle and Glass Company.   (For more on the company see the very recent article available on my other educational website at -  http://www.sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/AmericanBottleCo.pdf   Fowler's book does note that some bottles have the same heel codes but with a "9" instead of a "0" (i.e., 9 - S A B Co).  In fact, this particular bottle appears (with magnifying glass) to have the "0" cut over a "9"!  So this indicates that East Side Bottling ordered at least two batches of bottles - one in 1909 and one in 1910....cool!  Apparently, the company was in business earlier but it wasn't picked up in the business directories until 1912, then likely disappeared by 1913.  (Isn't this history sleuthing fun!)  The bottle is in essentially mint condition with very little wear (even to the embossing), some very faint wisps of internal haze, and a couple very tiny peck marks which all adds up to very fine shape for a a re-used soda bottle.  Rare item from Portland!  $30

 

CAPE ARGO / SODA WORKS / MARSHFIELD, ORE.  -  Mouth-blown (aka "hand-made") soda bottles from about anywhere in the state of Oregon besides Portland tend to be scarce to extremely rare.  There are a couple different soda bottles from Coos Bay/North Bend which are among the more obtainable ones from outside Portland.  (Coos Bay was known as Marshfield until the 1930s or so, if my memory isn't failing me.)  Hutchinson soda bottles with this same embossing are fairly abundant, though in my experience, these tooled crown top Cape Argo (Cape Argo is a ocean headland nearby) bottles are much less frequently seen although Ron Fowler (author of the Oregon soda bottle book) notes that both are "common."  This crown top example has PCGW (or Pacific Coast Glass Works) embossed on the lower front body (as shown in Fowlers book) but also has PCGW embossed on the base...which may be an unlisted variant as he was good about listing base embossing as well as the rest of the body embossing.  Click base view to see such.  The company was in business in Coos Bay from about 1904 to 1920 with the Hutchinson's certainly being used during first - maybe 1904 to 1910 or so - and these tooled crown cap versions likely being used from about 1910 to 1915.

This example is a pale greenish aqua and blown in a four piece mold like the Hutchinson's are.   The condition of this example is very good with some high point wear on the embossing and around the heel (case wear from reuse) and two open surface bubbles above the CA in CAPE with some dirt in one of them.  Otherwise no chips, cracks or noticeable staining (ok, a few internal wisps).  Since non-Portland Oregon Hutchinson's are getting prohibitively expensive (evidenced by a Lakeview Soda Works selling on eBay for $520 recently!) this could be a good addition to an Oregon, mouth-blown crown soda collection.  Bottle procured for and used on my Historic Bottle Website.   $25

 

 

Beers

ALBANY BREWING CO. / (fancy ABCo. monogram) / ALBANY, OR. - This is embossed within a somewhat oval ("slug") plate on this larger, 24 to 26 oz., blob-top export style beer bottle from somewhere in Oregon that is NOT Portland.  Mouth-blown, non-crown top beer bottles from other smaller cities/towns in Oregon are relatively far and few between.  Just a bit over 11.25" tall, this example has a tooled blob lip (aka "finish" in glassmaker parlance), is a medium to slightly darker amber with a reddish tint, and was blown in an post-bottom/base mold with several air vents on the front and back shoulder.  The base is embossed with S. B. & G. Co. indicating manufacture by the Streator Bottle & Glass Co. (Streator, IL.) who used that marking from 1881 to 1905 prior to be absorbed into the American Bottle Co. (A.B.Co.), which was later (1929) absorbed into the Owens-Illinois Glass Co. where they still maintain a plant I believe (Toulouse 1971). 

The Albany Brewing Co. operated under that company name from 1892 to 1906 being operated by William Faber at the corner of 9th & Lyon streets (Van Wieren 1995).  On the back heel is embossed the number 98 which is very likely a date code for 1898, which would fit nicely into the two known date ranges already noted above.  Streator was known to have used date codes a few years after this when under the umbrella of the A.B.Co., so this is an example of early date code use.  (Obviously, I love the history behind bottles...particularly Oregon ones!)  This example is in excellent condition - much better than the few other examples I've seen or owned and most re-used beer bottles in general - having almost no scuffing/wear on the body and basically no staining that I can see.  There are a couple tiny and hard to find "ping" marks near the base from reuse, a bit of faint and non-distracting scratching and is otherwise an exemplary example of this bottle!  Also has some bubbles and minor crudity and almost no wear to the embossing, which is unusual on reused beer bottles.  Nice glossy and bright example!  $80

 

FREDERICKSBURG / (emblem with F B Co inside of a shield) / BOTTLING CO. S. F. / THIS BOTTLE NOT / TO BE SOLD.   This large (about a quart & 11.5" tall), crudely made, heavily whittled, applied blob finish, bubbly thick olive green glass, champagne style beer bottle is very reminiscent of the "Apollinaris" style mineral water bottles.   According to Tom Quinn (in an excellent article in Thomas's 2002 book which was based on a lead in May Jones's books from the 1960s) - these bottles, as well as scores of other different beer (export and champagne) and cylinder liquor bottles, were made in Germany (like most Apollinaris bottles) for various far West Coast brewing and liquor companies (primarily California with some in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia). These were usually made for companies with German surnames or themes (like Fredericksburg).  These German-made bottles - or at least the ones with U. S. specific embossing - seem to be a phenomena of just West Coast brewing and liquor companies which is believed related to a connection with several importers in the Bay Area of German ancestry (Abramson & Heunisch in the early 1880s; possibly others later).   Anyway, this example is in near mint condition with just some very minor wear/scuffing and a very small open bubble on the rear heel.  Als0, as one can see in the image, it has the original porcelain stopper and bail; the top of the stopper is stenciled with FREDERICKSBURG BOTTLING CO. S. F.  A very nice example of an interesting relic of Western American history.  $75

 

GAMBRINUS BREWING CO. / GBCo monogram / PORTLAND, OR. - All of this is embossed inside of a circular "slug plate."  The base is also embossed with S B & G Co / 2 indicating production by the Streator Bottle & Glass Company of Streator, IL. (the "2" is a mold mark of unknown meaning) and the reverse heel is embossed with a very small 99 which might be a date code for 1899.  Click base view to see an image of the base.  This bottle is mouth-blown (aka hand-blown, like about everything I sell) with a tooled crown cap accepting finish, aqua in color, 11 1/4" tall "quart" size (about 22-24 oz. actually), and dates from 1899 to maybe 1905 when Streator merged into the American Bottle Co.  (As a side note, Gambrinus was known as the "patron saint of beer" and a name used by many American breweries during the late 19th and early 20th centuries - and even today in one instance.)  Condition of the bottle is about mint with very shiny clean glass and a few light scuff marks here and there.  The only issues are a small (3 mm wide by 1.5 mm high) shallow flake on the side of the top portion ("bead") of the lip/finish and one small (2-3 mm in diameter) impact mark on the lower back.  This bottle was also used for illustrating my Historic Bottle Website.  All things considered, this is a pretty good example of an Oregon beer bottle that one doesn't see that often.  $20

 

Pacific Beer, Tacoma, Washington pre-prohibition advertising tray - The Pacific Brewing & Malting Co. of Tacoma, WA. was a major early 20th century Tacoma area brewing company that bit the dust (or possibly moved to California)  in 1915 - according to Dale Van Wieren's "American Breweries II" book - when statewide alcohol Prohibition was self-inflicted on that state's residents a few years prior to National Prohibition.  This tray probably dates from between 1905 and 1915 and was manufactured using the printing techniques of the era, having the "dot pattern" (upon close inspection) similar to what sees on same period trade cards and lithographs. The tray has in VERY small print in the gold strip below "TACOMA" - CHAS. W. SHONK CO. LITHO CHICAGO NO. J4117 - the maker of the tray. The tray has an image of Mt. Rainier which is called Mt. Tacoma in the illustration (above the peak along with the 14,256 ft. elevation) which was the local Indian name for the mountain (though spelled a myriad of different ways over the years).  Condition of the tray is excellent with virtually no wear or chipping to the decorative front side (click image to enlarge) - really just a few light scratches -  and little wear to the solid green painted back.  (Click image of the tray back to see such.)  If I remember right, there were a few lightly to essentially unused examples of these trays discovered somewhere in the NW back in the late 1960s or very early 1970s (when this was acquired) in a couple different color schemes but with the same design.  I see one every now and then on eBay though they still seem to be somewhat scarce and one of the more affordable, pre-Prohibition Western beer trays.  $90


MISCELLANEOUS WESTERN BOTTLES

 

AMMONIA / MNFD. BY / S. F. GASLIGHT CO. - That is embossed on the larger (quart) size of the pair of bottles offered here; click close-up of embossing to see such.  The smaller (pint) example is embossed a bit differently as follows: AMMONIA / MANUF'D BY / S. F. GASLIGHT CO (i.e., with no period after the CO and MANUF'D instead of MNFD; click to see embossing.).  Why the embossing is different on the two I don't know, but obviously they were different molds and were likely produced a few years apart (more below).  I'm offering this pair together since they go together so well and both were acquired together in Nevada.  Both bottles have tooled "patent" lips or finishes, are of a typical blue aqua colored glass indicative of being blown at the SF&PGW, and are essentially in mint condition with no chips, cracks, nicks, basically no staining (a bit in the base of the smaller one though it may just be dirt) or anything distracting. 

More specifically, the quart (full size image available here) was produced in a post-base mold and has the unusual "blob" type air venting on both front and back shoulders that indicates manufacture in the early-ish 1880s according to research done by the late John Thomas.  (These same type air venting marks can be seen on the shoulder corners of the earlier PERUVIAN BITTERS from SF.)  The bottle has nice crudeness in the way of wavy glass, stretch marks on the lower neck, and a lot of seed bubbles in the glass.  Oh, and it has a backwards L embossed on the base...some cryptic mold tracking symbol I guess?  It is almost identical in size (height and diameter) to the well known U. S. A. HOSP. DEPT. bottles found during the late Civil War to early 1870s period, though this bottle is a bit later.  The embossing is proportionally rounded and wide - like many SF&PGW bottles of the era exhibit (no curved "R" since there are no "R"s) - and pretty bold; click on embossing to see it close-up.

The pint example was produced in a cup-base type mold and has the somewhat later (mid-1880s to 1890s) single "dot" air venting mark on the front & back shoulders.  The embossing on this example is also pretty good (click on AMMONIA / MANUF'D BY / S. F. GASLIGHT CO to see such) but a bit more flattened on the first two lines than the larger example...but is all distinct.  This one has even more seed bubbles in the glass, neck stretch markings and other nice crudeness...and is also essentially mint as noted earlier except for some wisps of dirt or haze in the very bottom.  A nice, visually appealing pair of larger, interesting Western made bottles!  Both for $90

 

SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORKS - Quart fruit jar.   Here is a rare and desirable Western made wax sealer fruit jar dating from the 1870s.  The glass is a classic "SFGW" bluish aqua, 7 1/2" tall, with applied (pressed on ring) wax seal type finish.  It has the classic SFGW "curved R's" which were apparently a stylistic trade mark of a particular mold cutter working for the SFGW and later for the  SF&PGW.  Click HERE for a close-up of the embossing.  There is also the usual blanked out plate curving above the San Francisco where the "Cutting & Co" (I think that is right) embossing was removed from the original configuration of the mold.  After this mold was used for the SFGW jars, all this embossing was blanked or "slugged" out in order to make the "M. Seller & Co. / Portland, O."  fruit jar in the early 1880s most likely (talk about recycling!).  The glass is crude, whittled, and bubbly and the wax seal lip is crudely applied...the way we like them.  The jar is largely mint though has/had a very small chip on the outer edge of the lip which has been repaired quite well, though the epoxy/resin does have a slight yellowish cast to it upon very close inspection.  This repair was reportedly (from the seller I acquired it from) done by Marty Hall who is well known in the West for quality work.  The repair appears to be only about 1/2" + or - long and very shallow (<1/4" deep) and something I wouldn't have bothered to have done.  Click HERE to see a close-up of the repair on the lip which is pointed out with an arrow.  There is also some neat crudeness to the inner ring just inside the repair which is not a chip, but totally in-making.  Bottle used for and pictured on the Historic Bottle Website.  A very nice jar which makes it easy to see why someone did take the trouble to repair the small chip - "damage" that is very minimal but enough to lower the price by several hundreds.  $450 

 

BELOW ITEMS ARE ALL SOLD!

PACIFIC / SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORK - PATD FEBY 9TH 1864 / VICTORY / 1 / REISD JUNE 22D 1867- This is a very esthetic example of these scarce Western made canning jars.  This example is the quart size (Red Book/Creswell #2895) with a good condition Mason's Improved type screw band and original domed glass insert (with some very minor roughness along its edge).  These Western made jars were blown at the Pacific Glass Works in San Francisco and I acquired this example for use on my Historic Bottle Website; the following is an excerpt from that site:

This (Pacific Glass Works) was the first truly successful glass maker west of the Rockies and in business from 1862 to 1876 when it was combined with the San Francisco Glass Works to form the San Francisco and Pacific Glass Works.  This information gives a likely manufacturing date range for this jar of 1867 to 1876, although it is possible that the molds (there were several sizes and variations made) continued in use by the combined company for some period after 1876.    

This example is a nice deeper blue-greenish aqua color (images capture it about right), very bold embossing - particularly on the Glass Work side, some nice whittle to the glass and is of nice, clean, unstained glass.  Otherwise about mint (few scratches) as is common with these jars, there is some grinding related flaking along the edge of the rim.  By far the most significant is one being about 1/4" wide and less in height (click on close-up of the lip to see such), one much smaller flake on the backside (along with the usual, no-harm tiny "fleabite" types), and a very short (3/16") "flash" or stress line from the rim down which is visible to the left of the pictured flake on the linked image.  This all sounds worse than it really is as this is an all-round very good example at a good price due to the small - though normally encountered - "issues."  SOLD!

FREDERICKSBURG / (emblem with F B Co inside of a shield) / BOTTLING CO. S. F. / THIS BOTTLE NOT / TO BE SOLD.   This large (24-26 oz. & 11.5" tall), crudely made, heavily whittled, applied blob finish, thick olive green glass, champagne style beer bottle is very reminiscent of the "apollinaris" style mineral water bottles.   According to Tom Quinn (in an excellent article in Thomas's 2002 book which was based on a lead in May Jones's books from the 1960s) - these bottles, as well as scores of other different beer (export and champagne) and cylinder liquor bottles, were made in Germany (like most apollinaris bottles) for various far West Coast brewing and liquor companies (primarily California with some in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia); often for companies with German surnames or themes (like Fredericksburg).  These German-made bottles - or at least the ones with U. S. specific embossing - seem to be a phenomena of just West Coast brewing and liquor companies which is believed related to a connection with several importers in the Bay Area of German ancestry (Abramson & Heunisch in the early 1880s; possibly others later).   Anyway, this example is in about mint condition with just some very minor wear/scuffing and a small nick at the base edge (visible at the linked image at about 11 o'clock).  This bottle was used for illustrating my Historic Bottle Website.  And interesting piece of Western American history.  SOLD!

W. J. VAN SCHUYVER / & (crown and shield with V monogram) Co. / PORTLAND - That embossing is inside of a more or less square slug plate looking outline, though I'm certain this is a proprietary mold and not a true slug plate - more below.  These bottles apparently contained a pretty popular product - Cyrus Nobel Whiskey - as these bottles span a pretty wide time frame (1880s to Oregon Prohibition in 1915).  The company was connected with the Lilienthal & Crown Distillery Companies (San Francisco) since the Van Schuyver bottles with inside threads (most have inside threads) come with the hard rubber stoppers that are embossed with CROWN DISTILLERIES COMPANY and the monogram for Lilienthal & Co....as does this offering. 

This example is almost certainly the second mold used for producing this company's bottles and as noted, doesn't appear to be a true removable and replaceable plate mold.  Instead, it was a full face, proprietary mold with a plate-like embossed square around the company embossing (see image above).  I've recorded 8 different molds (so far) used during the time span noted for the company above with the first (and fourth) molds being the only ones that are true plate molds.  That first mold is also the one that occasionally comes with a true applied lip, aka "glob top" without inside threads, though examples from that mold also come with a tooled, inside threaded conformation as well as tooled, without threads.  This second mold example has the exact same embossing, though a close inspection of the actually engraving of the two shows that this example is from a different mold.  (The third generation "PORTLAND" mold also has the same embossing pattern but it is different in the fine details from the two previous molds when products of all three are compared side to side...which I've done.  The first three molds were likely used by the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works as the conformation of the bottles is about identical...just different molds.)  This second mold also has 7 or 8 rivet or peen marks above the "VAN" in and around the embossed box line.  In any event, this is a much above average example of this bottle with a lot of body crudeness, bubbles in the glass, stretch marks in the neck, some whittle to the shoulder, domed base with a rough texture, and a great glossy surface...an all around very nice specimen dating from the 1890s.  In my search for mold variations over the past few year I've only run across a couple other examples of this mold making it the rarest of the 8 molds.  The height (without stopper) is 11.75" and the color is a rich, bright medium amber with a bit of a red tint compared to other examples I have.  The condition is essentially mint with no chips, cracks, scuffs, or staining - looks to have never been buried.  Great example of a Northwest favorite - yesterday and today!   ON HOLD (for the moment).

W. J VAN SCHUYVER / & (crown and shield monogram) Co. / INC. / PORTLAND, ORE. - Here is the likely eighth and likely final mold for this company prior to Oregon's Prohibition in 1915.  It has similar faux slug plate type embossing, but is also a proprietary mold (i.e., non-plate mold) like molds #2, #3, #5-#7. Van Schuyver incorporated in 1901 ( www.Pre-Pro.com ) so this bottle dates from that date or later as do molds #4-#7 which also have INC.  However, #4-#6 molds have the INC (#5 with a period after INC.; #4 & #6  without) embossed directly to the right of the monogram instead of under the monogram like molds #7 and this #8 example.  Mold #6  also has P. C. G. W. embossed on the base for the Pacific Coast Glass Works which began in 1902 and molds #4, #5 and #6 have OR (#4 with a period after OR.; #5 & #6 without) instead of ORE. for Oregon probably indicating an earlier date than the pictured bottle.  Confused?!  (Note: I intend on writing an article for the FOHBC's Bottles & Extras about this interesting progression of molds sometime in the near future using these bottles for illustrations as well as examples of the other three molds not offered for sale here.)

Anyway, the offered example is 11.25" tall, does not have inside threads (none apparently do), plain base (no embossing), copious air venting "dots", and likely dates from from between about 1912 to 1915 when Oregon Prohibition began.  The color is a medium amber with some bubbles spread around the body and some minimal crudeness to the lip and neck.  The condition is essentially mint with no staining, cracks, chips, or other issues.  ON HOLD (for the moment).

CALIFORNIA SODA WORKS / (upside down deer antlers or some such) / H. FICHEN / S. F. -  Reverse has an "eagle" with wings spread, chunk of string or rope in its beak, and and a couple arrows in its talons; sort of like some of the later historical flasks with the eagle, banner, etc.  This is the well known, but scarce, "Fichen Chicken" soda bottle named as such due to the proprietors name and the eagle on the reverse which is a bit primitive and "chicken" like I guess?  I think it is just that Fichen rhymes with chicken and sounds cool, eh?  Anyway, this example is about 6.8" tall, has an applied blob finish - typical for the style and era - and was blown in a non-air vented mold almost certainly in San Francisco.  It has an embossing pattern reminiscent of the Bay City Soda bottles of about the same era and shares the "deer horns" embossed on the front with another similar but even rarer soda bottle from Vallejo.  The color is a rich blue aqua glass as the images show.  Not quite a "colored" soda but close, and these do come in lighter shades of green and blue I believe.  The company was short lived being around for just a couple years (1878-1879) and somewhat connected to the C. A. Reiners & Co. (Eureka Soda Works) according to the Markota's book on Western blob sodas.  They (Markota's) also noted this was a "rare" bottle and indeed there doesn't seem to be that many around.  This is a really nice example that does appear to have been professionally cleaned in a restrained fashion; the embossing is certainly very bold.  There really are no issues with this bottle - no chips, cracks, or much wear at all - just a couple very tiny open bubbles and I guess a very small and hard to find spot of "ground wear" remaining.  A really nice looking bottle that is even better in "real life" than the images show and they look good.    SOLD!

DICKEY / (mortar & pestle with PIONEER / 1850 inside) / CHEMIST / S. F. - I don't know of any Western made/used bottle that has more "bottle coolness" packed into a similar size (or inexpensive a price) than these bottles!  Old (1870s), crude, neat "picture" embossing, applied lip, etc....oh, and the color!  These bottles are not real rare but popular for the obvious reasons and this is also a great, well above average example of the type.  Specifically, it is about 5.5" tall, has a crudely applied "patent" lip or finish, smooth base (indented with the usual "exclamation" mark in the center), and a rich sapphire blue glass.  There are many seed and other sized bubbles in the glass, stretch marks in the neck, and a lot of waviness and irregularities to the glass and glass surface that is just great looking!  Bottle is essentially dead mint; I can't find anything wrong with it - no cracks, chips, staining, or anything to mar its beauty.  These used to be around for relatively cheap prices (I've sold several in years past for significantly less) but that world is no more.  A great, albeit small, piece of Western Americana.  SOLD!

DR. MOTT'S / WILD CHERRY TONIC / A. H. POWERS & CO - This is one of the great rarities of Western medicinal tonic bottles - of which there is a small universe to begin with - although the Mott's do come in two versions.  The Powers example is reportedly (Bill & Betty Wilson's medicines book) the earliest and rarest of the two, though frankly both versions are equally rare in my observations.  (The other version is about identical but has SPRUANCE STANLEY & CO instead of A. H. POWERS & CO.)  The Powers examples reportedly date from 1879 or so; the other from the early 188os.  The tonic was trademarked in 1878 by A. H. Powers & Henderson of Sacramento, CA. though they apparently sold it to the other San Francisco company shortly thereafter...again according to the Wilson's.  This is a fine example of this bottle with good embossing - distinct as the image shows.  The bottle is a light-ish amber glass, just over 9" tall, has a very crudely applied "oil" finish or lip, blown in a post-base mold, and has a smooth base with an embossed dot in the center.  The condition is excellent with no cracks or dings; just a couple very short (<1/2") scratches on the non-embossed sides and some light staining in a few inside edges.  I don't believe it has ever been cleaned and doesn't really need it as the staining is faint and non-distracting. This bottle is of a fairly light (thinner) glass compared to similar "case" bottles (like Hostetter's Bitters which are usually much heavier) with some dimpling on the panel surfaces that add a bit to the crudeness.  Here is a cool Western rarity which is very hard to find!  SOLD!

F. ZIMMERMAN / 233 FIRST ST / PORTLAND - Another rare flask from Portland, Oregon is this pint F. Zimmerman picnic flask.  These picnics only come in the pint size according to Thomas's book on the subject, though there is also a pint coffin flask which most likely used the same engraved plate (a common occurrence).  Ferdinand Zimmerman was located 233 First St. from formation of the company in 1879 until 1895 when they moved to larger quarters a couple blocks away (103 Front St.).  Although the quart, "Mail Order House" cylinder whiskey bottles from the company are quite common, the coffin and picnic flasks are hard to come by.  I suspect the flask dates from the late 1880s to 1895 era.  This example is 6.5" tall, has a typical tooled double ring lip or finish, and has a nice "pink" tint to it indicating that the otherwise colorless/clear glass was decolorized with manganese dioxide...typical of colorless bottles of that era.  The condition is very good to near mint with some very light haze primarily on the inside back and maybe some even lighter haze in other parts of the inside; outside seems clean and shiny.  The only "issue" with is that there is a 2 mm white-ish soda particle in the top edge of the lip on the front left (visible in the enlarged image) which has a small bit of reflectivity or iridescence to the lower right edge of the particle.  Totally in-making, but it is there.  This is overall a well above average condition picnic flask which tend to be water stained if dug...and virtually all were dug.  Good eye appeal too! SOLD!

F. ZIMMERMAN / 233 FIRST ST / PORTLAND - Here is another rare Zimmerman flask - the 1/2 pint coffin with the same embossing as the pint listed above.  History is the same of course and it likely dates from the same era, though maybe a bit earlier (mid-1880s to early 1890s) than the picnic flask.  This flask is 5.75" tall, colorless glass with maybe a bit of a straw tint, tooled brandy finish or lip, and very sharply embossed like the example above also.  Unlisted in this size in Thomas's 1998 book (only the pint is noted) so these are probably pretty rare, though I'm sure there are a few around.  Since this is a different engraved plate than the pint above I would bet there are also half pint picnics - utilizing the same plate - out there somewhere though not mentioned in Thomas.  Condition is excellent with no chips, cracks, flashes or the like but does have some scattered light haze.  Again, an above average example I think with some nice bubbles in the glass and good eye appeal.  SOLD!

GOLD SEAL LIQUOR CO. / 164-166 2ND ST. / PORTLAND, ORE. - This is a scarce to rare flask (most all liquor flasks from Portland are not very plentiful) of the style called the "Baltimore Oval" in some glass makers catalogs.  Collectors have yet to really discover this style but they are likely equally hard to find as their earlier (and contemporary) brethren the shoo-fly, coffin and picnic flasks.  These flasks in Oregon typically date from the early 1900s up until statewide Prohibition was enacted in Oregon effective at the end of 1915.  This liquor company originated about 1911 and occupied the quarters of the Coblentz & Levy Liquor Company who moved to another location at the time.  Since Prohibition was effected by late 1915 this company didn't have much of a run so their products are probably not very plentiful.  Thomas notes that these only came in the pint and half pint sizes, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were some quart examples out there like most of the Portland Baltimore Oval style flasks.  This example is the half pint, 6.5" tall,  has a tooled "brandy" type finish or lip, is a plate molded bottle (aka "slug plate") and is of a colorless/clear glass that looks like it could turn amethyst...though isn't now.  The condition of this example is near mint with no chips, cracks or any real issues...just a few minor spots of internal staining (or maybe it is dirt?).  Has some decent crudity to the tooling of lip and body including some scattered bubbles...not bad for a very late mouth-blown or hand-made bottle.  The company also issued some nice shot glasses, put up liquor in glass and ceramic jugs and had at least one rare cylinder made for them.  SOLD!

KELLY'S FAMILY LIQUOR STORE / PARK & MORRISON STS. / PORTLAND, OREGON - This is one of a small grouping of early 20th century Portland liquor flasks (all Baltimore Ovals) used by firms that had "Family Liquor Store" in their names.  What an interesting concept and something that was certainly used in a vain attempt to deflect the ever growing temperance movement in Oregon that ended up with the passage of statewide alcohol Prohibition in 1915.  Some of the other "Family Liquor Stores" are Kline's and Gulley's and at least one other I can't recall.  John E. Kelly began in the saloon business in 1900 (Mascot Saloon) but branched out as a sole proprietor in 1905 running his retail and wholesale business up until shut down by Prohibition.  These flasks are also listed by Thomas as coming in only the pint and half pint sizes but there could be quarts out there somewhere.  This example is the half pint at 6.5" tall, 1233 embossed on the base, a crudely tooled "brandy" finish or lip, and a clear/colorless glass that seems to have a slight straw tint (or maybe it is a bit pink?).  Condition is near mint with only some very small and minor haze spots in the lower inside.  This example also has some crudity in the form of bubbles in the glass and stretch marks in the neck and lip.  Excellent example of a fairly rare flask.  SOLD!

L. EPPINGER / PORTLAND. -  That is embossed inside a round "plate" on this 1/2 pt. (actually more like 5-6 oz. - a "scant" size they called them back then) shoo-fly flask from the first owner of the Bureau Saloon in Portland.  Louis Eppinger was a true "Western man" of the time having run saloons in San Francisco in the 1860s and 1870s before moving to Portland to open the famous (to NW bottle collectors anyway) Bureau Saloon in 1877.  He owned it - sometimes with others - until selling out in 1884 though did open another saloon in 1885, selling out in 1886.  He eventually moved back to SF to run his old saloon into the 1890s.  This flask according to Thomas was made during "The Bureau" saloon period of 1877-1884 and as such would be one of the earliest, clear/colorless glass embossed flasks from Portland...or the West for that matter.  However, it seems possible that it was used during the 1885-1886 period as that saloon (at 160 First St.) was not far from where this flask was personally dug by my brother and I back in the late 1960s!  This example is most likely "as made" but not perfect.  It has no chips, cracks, dings, or staining of any significance but does have an open bubble on the reverse that has a bit of size and depth, i.e., is about 5/16ths wide and 3/16ths high.  Click reverse view to see the back side of this flask and the open bubble on the upper right shoulder.  Otherwise a nice flask that has more crudeness to it than most later shoo-fly/coffin flasks.  Priced accordingly.  SOLD!

G. GINOCCHIO & CO. / 164 1ST. ST. / PORTLAND, OR. -  This is a very rare shoo-fly flask from Portland which does come in the half pint (this example) and pint size (and in picnic flasks also).  One never did see these around much back when I was a teenager digging in Portland, and even less today.  I think this one came from the collection of Western flask collector Ralph Van Brockin via Bob Barnett from whom I actually procured this and many rare Portland flasks from years ago.  Thomas is a bit contradictory on when the company - Giuseppi Ginocchio & Co. - was at this address versus the other address (also found on picnic and shoo-fly flasks) at 287 First St.  Lets just call it 1880s.  This example is about 6" tall, smooth base, embossing in the round "slug" plate as the images show, and has a tooled "brandy" style lip or finish.  This example isn't perfect (few are in my experience) with a small (5 mm x 3 mm) flake off the side of the lip and two smaller, very thin flat flakes off the top of the rim to the right of the side flake.  Click close-up of the lip to see these "issues" pointed out - side flake with a circle and the thin flakes above the arrows.  They really aren't that noticeable, but of course, they are there.  There is also some light haze in a few spots on the bottle, but it is a pretty clean flask...again, compared to the few others I've seen.  No not perfect, but how many opportunities does one get to acquire one of the rarer Portland embossed flasks?   SOLD!

G. GINOCCHIO & CO. / 164 1ST. ST. / PORTLAND, OR. -  Same company as above, but if anything an even rarer version - the pint picnic flask!  This one also came from the collection of Western flask collector Ralph Van Brocklin via the late Bob Barnett.  The brief history on the bottle is as outlined above so I won't belabor it here.  This example is a bit over 6.5" tall, smooth base, embossing in the round "slug" plate as the images show, and has a crudely tooled "bead" style lip or finish which was probably intended to be a double ring type but the finishing workman wasn't really even close (didn't squeeze the finishing tool tight enough?).  Also and 1880s flask most likely.  This example is physically perfect (no chips, cracks, dings or other issues) but does have some overall light haze primarily on the inside which isn't too distracting to my eye (click image to see a larger version) and could be machine cleaned by those who do such.  A pretty nice flask which is one of the harder to get of the Portland, OR., late 19th century liquor flasks.  SOLD!

K. SEELIG &Co. / IMPORTERS / & DEALERS / IN / FINE WINES & LIQUORS / PORTLAND. O'N. - All that embossed within a circular "slug plate" on this rare, pint shoo-fly flask from Portland.  I've had this flask since the 1970s having picked it up at one of the Lewis & Clark Historic Bottle Club shows back then.  Off the top of my head, this is the only Oregon embossed bottle that I can recall with that interesting abbreviation for Oregon - O'N.  Looks to me like the mold (plate) engraver ran out of room and made up his own abbreviation!  This is a true "shoo-fly" flask as it has the rounded narrow sides vs. the "coffin" style which has the flattened sides.  A fine differentiation to be sure, but one that collectors like to make as they are slightly differently shaped flasks although bottle makers of the period just referred to the style as a "shoo-fly."  These are quite rare flasks also and were only made, according to Thomas's book on Oregon liquor bottles, in the pint size - no half-pint (or picnic) equivalents like many other neighboring Portland companies used.  Thomas also dated these to the first half of the 1880s, i.e., 1880 to 1886 which seems about right.  Karl Seelig was located at 163 Second Street most likely when this flask was used, though possibly it was after his move to 50 Front St. in 1884. The company was dissolved in 1886 so it can't be any later than that.  It is a bit over 7" tall, has a tooled "brandy" type finish or lip, colorless glass that may turn amethyst (?), and a smooth slightly indented base with a faintly embossed flattened diamond which likely indicates manufacture by the Illinois Glass Co.  The bottle is in very good condition with just some very faint haze, some minor scuffing, and a small (~5mm long & 2-3mm wide) thin flake off the lower left corner which is barely visible in the enlarged version of the image (click to enlarge).  No other chips, cracks, or other post production damage.  Very nice example of a flask that is both rare and usually more stained.   SOLD!

JOYS - SARSAPARILLA - THE / EDWIN W. JOY CO. / SAN FRANCISCO - The embossing is scattered on three sides of this rectangular medicine bottle from California; the remaining (back) side is a typical plain, indented label panel.  Actually, all of the sides are indented and the embossing is bold and distinct - sometimes these are not that boldly embossed in my experience.  This very nice example is a "Western" blue aqua, tooled single collar ("patent" finish), smooth slightly indented base, almost 9" tall, ca. 1880s to 1890s.  A scarce sarsaparilla from the West which didn't produce very many embossed sarsaparilla bottles it seems.  Condition is near mint with no chips, cracks, staining or other post-production damage besides a light scratch on the upper right part of the front panel (visible in the image).  It also has some body crudeness and bubbles in the glass adding to its visual appeal.  Nice example.  SOLD!

"WE NEVER SLEEP" / MUEGGE "THE DRUGGIST" / BAKER, ORE. -  Also embossed with MUEGGE'S on the upper back side.   A familiar and very popular bottle in and out of Oregon because of it's intensely brilliant emerald green color, i.e., "7-Up green."  This is the 6 oz. size offered here (to the left).  I've heard that there are allegedly something like 6 different sizes of these colorful prescription bottles, though personally I've only see three sizes, i.e., 12 oz., 6 oz, and 3 oz.  This middle size is about 6 1/2", has the standard tooled "prescription" finish, smooth base (embossed C. L. G. CO. for the Carr-Lowrey Glass Company - a bottle making company that specialized in prescription bottles - especially colored ones - during the very early 20th century), and date ca. 1905-1915.  Condition of this example is essentially mint - just a very small scuff mark on the edge of the back panel - with shiny, unstained glass, no chips, cracks, or nicks.   This bottle (like most) were never buried I believe...and part of a set of three sizes that is harder to put together than in years past. 

"WE NEVER SLEEP" / MUEGGE "THE DRUGGIST" / BAKER, ORE. - (above right)  I am also offering an individual example of the smallest size (3 ounce, 5") Muegge...also in essentially perfect condition.  (Bottle pictured to the immediate right.)

WORMSER BROS' / (round indentation) / SAN FRANCISCO. - Here is one of the classic Western (made) bottles - the famous Wormser barrel!  This is the only true Western barrel bitters (or maybe used for liquor too?) bottle (the Turner Brothers barrels are really Eastern items). 

These used to be virtually unobtainable - rarely seen even - but due to a couple small caches of them being found in recent years (western Nevada & northwest Oregon reportedly) there are a few around now...including this very nice example.  These bottles date from only 1869 according to Wichmann's great "Antique Western Bitters Bottles" book (and the Wilson's 1969 classic) who listed them as valued at "$3000 to $7000" in the various shades of amber (the unique light citron green example was unknown at that time).  Well, now that there are more of them on the market, the prices have come down...Economics 101!  However, there is still a very limited supply of these and they are not showing up much of recent. 

Anyway, this offered example is almost 10" tall, has an applied, one-part "oil" type lip or finish, smooth shallowly domed base, and is in a very nice yellow with an amber tone.  Call it light yellow amber if you will; lighter than the average example but not quite as light as the lighter example pictured in Wichmann's book.  The close-up of the upper body to the left above shows the tone of the color best to my eye.  This example is in near mint condition with no chips, cracks, pings, dings or flea-bites (OK one tiny pin prick mark on the back and a very light, short scratch).  It has been professionally cleaned (like most of the recent finds) and does retain some scattered, though very light (can't even be seen in the images) residual etching on the inside; the outside is sparkling and smooth.  A very nice example that every Western bottle collector should have.  This one is priced within the range of the various shades-of-amber ones sold over the past few years.  SOLD! 

E. C. JORGENSEN & CO. / E C J & Co monogram / PORTLAND, OR. - Here is one of the rarer and harder to acquire Portland cylinder fifth whiskey bottles.  Embossed as noted, this bottle was only used for a short time according to John Thomas, i.e., 1902 to 1905.  The Marx & Jorgensen company was founded in 1877.  Daniele Marx sold his interest to Emil C. Jorgensen in 1902 and it continued as E. C. Jorgensen & Co. until 1905 when the business was sold or otherwise disappeared.  The company used a lot of different liquor bottles including the almost mythical (one known) amber glob top embossed "Marx & Jorgensen / Wholesale Wine and / Whiskey Merchants /Portland, Oregon" - probably (?) the most valuable Oregon bottle.  Also notable were the fancy embossed bottles used for "Commodore's Royal O. K.  Old Bourbon" that the company purveyed.  Anyway, this particular example I've had for upwards of 40 years and really should keep it, but I need to thin things out...so here it is.  I acquired this bottle from the people in Summit, Oregon (west of Corvallis where I was going to college) who owned the old store building which was built in 1901.  This bottle was found underneath the store so it has technically never been buried...and still has the original cork!  The bottle is essentially mint with just a few wisps of content staining inside.  The bottle is almost 12" tall, smooth base (embossed 265 1/2; wonder what the 1/2 indicated as a mold number?), and has a tooled brandy finish.  It has some nice bubbles in the glass and would turn amethyst with some exposure to sunlight, which it didn't have under the Summit store.  I've seen a couple others through the years (several were damaged) but this is the nicest one of those few.  SOLD!

DR. HENLEY'S / WILD GRAPE ROOT / IXL (in an oval) / BITTERS - Here is another example of this great (big) Western bitters bottle which upon close inspection was almost certainly blown in the same mold as the one above but with bolder embossing.  Interesting as to why the difference in the embossing? I would guess either the blower had a cold or other lung problems (they did "wear" out), the mold itself was wearing out or most likely the inside mold surface was fouled with lubricant and in need of a good cleaning.  (See the above write-up for more information on these bottles.)  In any event, this is also a nice looking example with distinctly bolder embossing (click on images to see larger versions).  It is also fairly crude with bubbles and wavy glass, stretch marks in the neck, and a nice bluish aqua with just a bit less intensity compared to the one above.  The lip or finish is crude and crudely applied.  Click close-up of the upper neck and lip/finish to see such.  This example is just about dead mint with a couple wisps of faint haze inside and a few very small unobtrusive scratches to the outside surface; no chips, cracks, fisheyes, dings, or staining of significance.  All round this is a very solid example. SOLD! 

FULL MEASURE / H. VARWIG & SON / (H. V. & SON monogram) / PORTLAND, ORE. - Here is a relatively common Portland, Oregon whiskey bottle in very uncommon condition, i.e., with the full labels and original hard rubber inside screw threaded cap!  I purchased this bottle from the late Bob Barnett of Lakeview, OR. several decades ago and to date is the only fully labeled Varwig whiskey bottle that I've ever seen.  The neck and body labels are 100% complete with the neck label almost perfect and the body label pretty darn nice with just some scuffing and wear as one can see in the images (click to enlarge).  These labels are guaranteed to be original to the bottle, not something added in later years from some hoard of warehoused labels (which I've never heard of anyway for this brand).  One sees the etched shot glasses around now and then advertising the VIM brand.  This example has, or course the usual embossing on the reverse largely in a true slug plate (the FULL MEASURE is embossed above the plate).  Click embossing side to see an image of the reverse.  Bottle is about mint with no chips, cracks, staining, or issues besides one short scratch on the side.  Oh, and the stopper is "embossed" with H. VARWIG & SON - PORTLAND, ORE.  I should probably keep it, but have too much stuff so here is your chance to enhance your Oregon or Portland bottle collection!  SOLD!

RICHARD KNOLL / WHOLESALE / LIQUORS / PORTLAND, OR. - This is both a very rare flask and an exceptional example which acquired from the person who had just dug it in Portland.  This the pint size coffin flask with all that embossing inside of the circular "slug" plate.  The bottle is about 7.25" tall, has a typical tooled brandy style finish or lip, smooth base and dates from the late 1880s or early 1890s.  Specifically, R. Knoll was saloon owner beginning in 1877 at the northeast corner of Third and Alder. About 1880 he started purveying wholesale liquors along with the retail saloon selling out both in 1893 (though he later got back into liquors again).  John Thomas dated these flasks (there is also a pint picnic flask and half pint versions of both the coffin and picnic...though few are known of each type) from about 1887 to 1893 which seems about right given the way they were manufactured.  Anyway this is as fine a specimen condition-wise as one can get being essentially dead mint with only a few wisps of dirt in the front lower body.  Otherwise there are no chips, dings, cracks, fleabites, or noticeable staining - shiny and as nice as one can find.  SOLD!

ZIMMERMAN & MEYER / (Z & M monogram) / EAST / PORTLAND, OR. - Here is another very rare seldom seen flask that is the only example I've ever seen for sale...when I purchased it many years ago from the late Bob Barnett (also I believe a divestment from the Van Brocklin collection).  There aren't many liquor bottles (an assortment of druggists though) that have "East Portland" embossed on them.  Up to about 1892 or 1893 (if my memory serves me correctly) it was a separately incorporated city which was annexed in the early 1890s into Portland proper.  It along with Albina were separate towns on the east bank of the Willamette River; Albina was also annexed about the same time.  Anyway, this is a pint picnic flask with the embossing inside of a typical, circular "slug" plate.  The bottle is 6.5" tall, clear or colorless glass that has a slight (I think) pink tint, and dates from about 1889 to 1891 when Ferdinand Zimmerman and Henry Meyer operated a saloon in East Portland at 1229 4th Street.  They were there until 1891, moving to Union Avenue then until 1893.  These bottles also come in pint and half pint version of picnic and coffin flasks...a common occurrence with Portland liquor dealers who wanted the status (?) of their own proprietary flasks.  (I also have a half pint example of the picnic but keeping it since my brother and I dug it as teenagers back in the late 1960s in...East Portland.)  This bottle is in very good shape with no chips or notable cracks though does have some light water staining here and there.  There is also a very small (2-3 mm) "flash" in the back edge of the lip as well as a small in-making particle on the front left side of the lip (visible in image to right) that has a small in-making hairline of sorts coming off of it.  Both issues are minor, but they are there.  In any event, these flasks are almost impossible to get but this one is priced reflecting the noted issues.  SOLD!

COTTLE, POST & CO. / (phoenix bird rising from the ashes) / PORTLAND OGN - Here is one of the favorite of Oregon - and Western (maybe all!) - bottle collectors, the colorful medium blue-green Cottle & Post blob soda bottle.  Cottle, Post & Co. owned and operated the "Eagle and Excelsior Soda Works" from 1877 to 1881 on Front Street just west of the Willamette River in down town Portland (precursor to the "Portland Soda Works").  Although older than the E. A. Post blob soda bottles (E. A. Post operated the company in 1881 and 1882 without Cottle), the Cottle & Post bottles have an early tooled blob finish, whereas the E. A. Post bottles always have an applied blob.  Also, even though the embossing pattern is similar on the two bottles, the E. A. Post bottles were certainly blown in San Francisco (SF&PGW) as they have the distinctive "curved R" in the embossing pattern; the Cottle, Post bottles do not have that attribute even though they are of the right era.  Conclusion?  The Cottle & Post bottles were likely blown somewhere else - location unknown - or at least the mold was made by someone other than the famous but anonymous Bay Area mold engraver/maker who left his mark with the distinctive "R"s.  In any event, this is a nice example that has some very nice whittle to the glass...a very unusual attribute for these bottles.  The condition is near mint with very limited case wear (virtually none on the letters as is common on sodas) and scuffing and only a couple pin point "ping" marks on the body; no chips, cracks, or "flea bites."  It also has some  interesting crudeness and bubbles in the neck and (one small one is open on the inside it appears) which is somewhat visible in the full bottle image (click to view a larger example).  In any event, this is one of the nice, cruder ones I've seen and these are just not "around" much anymore.  SOLD!

BLUMAUER & HOCK / H&B monogram) / PORTLAND, ORE. - This a fairly rare cylinder fifth liquor bottle from Portland that is embossed in a true slug plate as noted; manufacturer unknown.  The bottle is 12" including the inside screw thread cap, has a tooled inside thread lip or finish, original cap I believe (there were never any Blumauer & Hock "embossed" hard rubber caps to my knowledge), and a smooth base with no embossing on it.  According to Thomas's Oregon liquor bottles book, Solomon Blumauer partnered in 1899 with Eugene Hock (already in the liquor business since 1890) to form Blumauer & Hock who remained in business until the groundswell of statewide Prohibitionist fervor eliminated the production and sale of all beer and liquor (and most wine) in Oregon in 1915.  These cylinder whiskeys were likely produced and used during the 1900-1910 era and are the only bottles used by the company that had their name embossed, though Thomas shows lots of other bar bottles, some regular bottles, and lots of shot glasses that the company used.  This example is essentially mint with no staining, chips, cracks or other post-production issues...I suppose there is a few small wear marks here and there, but it is in very fine condition.  The color is a medium, bright amber color.  Nice example of a rare-ish Portland tool top whiskey bottle that just isn't seen very much these days.  Another ex-Bob Barnett bottle I acquired a long time ago from.  SOLD!

J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON / (crown) / A. P. HOTALING & Co. / SOLE AGENTS  - (Bottle to the far left.) All this is embossed in a circle on yet another, familiar (to Western collectors) fifth sized liquor bottle from San Francisco...the bottle pictured to the left here.  This version (Thomas 44C with the "S" in AGENTS underneath the "G" in HOTALING) dates from 1884 to 1886 according to the late Mr. Thomas, has a crudely applied lip (close-up image of lip), smooth slightly domed base, 2-piece mold, and is embossed with A No 1 on the reverse not in a circle.  Color is a nice honey amber and the glass has lots of nice stretched teardrop bubbles and a bit of whittle.  Click close-up image of the embossing to see such.  A very nice solid example that is in essentially mint condition...in fact, I can't find anything wrong with it (OK a few very, very shallow tiny open bubbles).   SOLD!

J. H. CUTTER / OLD / BOURBON / (crown) / BOTTLED BY / A. P. HOTALING & Co  - (Bottle to the near left.)  All this is embossed in a circle on yet another, familiar (to Western collectors) fifth sized liquor bottle from San Francisco - the last of the run of true applied lip (aka "glob top") J. H. Cutter cylinders.  This version (Thomas 45) dates from 1886 to when these began to be tooled (likely late 1880s) according to the late Mr. Thomas.  It has a true applied lip although it doesn't have much "slop" (close-up image of lip), smooth slightly domed base, 2-piece mold, and is embossed with A No 1 on the reverse in a circle.  Color is a nice medium amber that passes light easily and the glass has some nice long bubbles in the neck and shoulder.  Click close-up image of the embossing to see such.  Another very solid example that is in essentially mint condition; in fact, I can't find anything wrong with it besides a couple minor scuffs.  SOLD! 

OWEN CASEY / EAGLE SODA / WORKS - SAC CITY - At one point I had a short run of different colors in these interesting though not uncommon early, smooth base, California soda bottles.  All sold now except for this one which is one of the rarer of the color shades - a true, clear green.  Click comparison image to see this bottle sitting next to another (Oregon) soda in a SFGW blue aqua.  All the posted images show the glass color pretty well.  These bottles date from between 1867 and 1871 (from the Markota's 1993 book) so they are among the earlier of the non-pontiled California soda bottles though almost certainly made in San Francisco.  Interestingly, the bottles do not have the curved "R" lettering as they likely just predate the famous mold engraver/fabricator that left his "makers mark" in the form of that distinctive letter.  It is believed that he started his work around 1870 which was just after when the one mold used for these bottles was initially made around 1867.  (All examples I've seen came from the same mold anyway.)

Anyway...this bottle is an excellent example with hammered whittle, lots of seed bubbles, and crudity befitting its ca. 1870 origin.  It has very minor case wear and appears to have never been cleaned though it has no notable staining.  This example does have a very small "ice pick" nick in the lip with a small (3-4 mm) "flash" coming off of it; this can be seen in the image at this link - close-up of the neck and lip.  That image also shows the color pretty well.  A very similar light to medium green example just sold at American Bottle Auctions for $650 (plus 10%)!  My offering appears to be very close to that examples color and crudity...except for the noted post production nick which is non-distracting to my eye.  You be the judge; priced accordingly.  SOLD!

NORTH WESTERN / BOTTLING CO / BUTTE, MONT. - This is embossed within an off-round (slightly oval) "slug" plate on this scarce Hutchinson soda bottle from the famous mining town of Butte, Montana.  I don't know anything about the history of this company or the actual rarity of the bottle but haven't seen that many of these through the years; don't even remember where I acquired this one (probably in Montana).  This one appears to be MT0033 on Ron Fowlers GREAT Hutchinson website (no makers marking, with the NORTH and WESTERN split into two words) though his illustrated example is colorless (pinkish) glass not aqua like this one ( www.Hutchbook.com ).  This example is almost 6.5" tall, has a tooled "blob" finish, a smooth base (no embossing), and probably dates from maybe as early as the late 1890s to early 1910s.  Condition is a bit rough though there are no chips, cracks or heavy staining.  It does have some scattered dirt still inside, has extensive case wear to the heel, the sides (mostly faint vertical scratches from sliding into a case against other soda bottles), and on the embossing which shows in the image.  There is also an assortment of various sized, though generally small flashes or "bulls eyes" on the base (again from the case handling), on the sides and a couple very small ones on the lip.  All sounds worse than it really is and it displays pretty well all things considered.  SOLD!

PIONEER SODA WORKS / SMITH & BRIAN CO. / RENO, NEV. - This is a nice example of a now very scarce to rare (these days) soda bottle from Reno, Nevada.   According to Holabird's great book on Nevada bottles, these were used from about 1900 to 1906 when the two guys noted in the embossing - a Mr. Smith and Henry A. Brian - became proprietors of the concern (1900) to when the business was sold to A. M. Britt (1906).  They referred to themselves in their advertizing as "The Soda Men."  Holabird noted that these used to be fairly abundant in the 1970s, but were apparently gradually locked up in collections (there is a lot of Nevada bottle collectors) over the years making them a fairly rarely encountered soda these days.  This - as all examples - was blown in a four-piece mold (not uncommon with Western Hutchinson's from the early 1900s), has a tooled "blob" lip/finish, a nice light greenish aqua, and is base embossed with 329 / H.  Many think the "H" stands for the Holt Glass Works from the Bay Area.  However, that probably isn't likely as research has shown that factory bit the dust in the 1890s (an article on Holt is pending soon on my other educational website).  Certainly these were made by some Western glass company, but which one I don't know.  Anyway, this is a very nice example with just a bit of high point wear to the embossing and around the edge of the base, some very minor scuff marks on the body (hard to see), and a faint wisp line of content staining but has no chips, cracks, or distracting faults. Oh, and it has the original Hutchinson stopper in place.  Great example!  SOLD!

HOLLISTER / & CO. / HONOLULU - Talk about "Western" soda bottles, these sodas have to be the most "Western" or even beyond the West - the Hollister blob sodas from Honolulu, Hawaii.  Not precisely sure where these were made, but the only "R" on the bottle has that distinctive curve or curl to the extending leg that indicates production (or at least mold engraving) at one of the two main San Francisco glass companies at the time of production (early 1870s; Pacific or San Francisco Glass Works).  However, these early Hollister blob soda bottles have the true two-piece "key mold" conformation which is at least unusual on Western blob sodas of that era in my experience (most are post-mold conformation).   (Incidentally, a "key mold" conformation is a type of "hinge mold" with one mold base side "keying" or protruding into an opposing indentation on the other mold base side of the two-piece mold.  See my Historic Bottle Website "Bases" page for more information: http://www.sha.org/bottle/bases.htm  ) 

In any event, this bottle was blown in the long used mold that had the original "H & H" covered over with two little plates (aka "slugged out") and replaced with "& CO." and "HOLLISTER" engraved ("cut") above that work.  According to Elliot & Gould's' GREAT book on Hawaiian bottles (Elliot & Gould 1988) this mold was used from the original "H & H" bottles made in 1869 until the mid-1880s (about 15 years of use!) when the company moved to the use of various Hutchinson style soda bottles.  Using the picture key in the book to date this bottle, it appears it is of the "circa 1873" conformation given the somewhat shortened neck and "applied rounded blob top" finish.  It is a bit over 7" tall, a bluish aqua color (images show it pretty well) and has lots of seed & larger bubbles in the glass as well as some striations to the neck - a really nice "look" to it all round.  As far as condition there are a few very small, shallow in-making open bubbles (the most distinct is inside the "C" in CO.; see the close-up image above which shows it is small); very little spotty haze in a few places inside though the outside is a nice original and likely (but not sure) non-tumbled surface; and a couple small pin-prick type impact marks on the surface from case bumping.  Overall this is an nice crude example in great condition that is getting harder to acquire these days.  SOLD!

IMPERIAL / BOTTLING WORKS / PORTLAND, OREGON - This is embossed in a somewhat oval slug plate on this actually fairly rare and hard to find Portland, Oregon Hutchinson soda bottle.  Ron Fowler listed these as "rare" in his great book on Oregon soda bottles ("Ice-Cold Soda Pop: An Illustrated History of Oregon Soda Pop Bottlers") which means he believed there were 10-25 examples extant.  I've only had one other of these bottles over the years so believe they are indeed pretty rare.  These are also embossed on the back heel with McC. 7 which indicates it was manufactured by William McCully & Co., one of the biggest and long lived of the 19th century Pittsburgh glass makers...a "dynasty" according to the legendary Dr. Julian Toulouse's "Bottle Maker's and Their Marks" book from 1971.   Although the company dates back to the 1830s, this particular mark was used from the mid-1870s to 1896 when the company ceased the production of bottles (they made only window glass until they ceased operations in 1909).   Ron Fowler apparently found no history on the company (the date listed is "?") so it remains enigmatic though the McC makers marking indicates it dates no later than 1896.  Condition of this example is excellent - near mint with just some very minor scuffing and a several inch scuff type scratch on the back; otherwise the bottle has no chips, cracks, or other damage and has very clean, non-stained glass.  SOLD!

HOFFMAN & JOSEPH / (lion on a column) / ALBANY, OGN. - A very scarce to moderately rare Oregon blob top soda bottle from the only other city in Oregon than Portland to produce blob tops soda bottles (and Albany produced two...this and the related H. D. / ALBANY, O.).  Almost 7" tall, light greenish aqua in color, applied blob finish, smooth base, ca. 1880s.  This is the only example of the Hoffman & Joseph bottles I've encountered with a true applied lip.  I'm pretty sure there must be more around, but this is the only one to my memory.  The physical condition of this bottle is about mint with no chips, cracks, digs, etc.  It does have a few very light scuff marks and some relatively faint water staining inside on one side in a pattern showing that it laid on its side - tipping slightly down - for a century or more (i.e., a dug bottle like virtually all these I've seen).  A must for the Oregon collector and a rare variation with the true applied finish.   SOLD!

G. & M. BOTTLING CO. / (G&M monogram) / REGISTERED / PORTLAND, OREGON - This is embossed within a somewhat oval plate (aka "slug plate") on this tall and narrow style of Hutchinson soda with a mug base.  These are fairly rare bottles or at least I have sure seen few of them over the decades and this is the only one I've ever had I think.  The "G" is for John Gagen who operated various soda works around the state from the 1880s to early 1910s including the very small (at the time) eastern Oregon towns of Sumpter, Pendleton, Bend and Baker City.  All this according to Ron Fowler's great book on Oregon soda bottles...where he also noted that this particular bottle was used for only one year, apparently for the Lewis & Clark Exposition in 1905.  No mention of whom the "M" was as Gagen's partner.  The bottling works was on Union Avenue in East Portland (now Martin Luther King Blvd. I think).  Guess that explains the rarity of these, eh?  At the heel inside the "mug" panels is embossed with S. B. & G. Co. which is one of the makers markings for Streator Bottle & Glass Company, who used that mark from the 1880s to 1905; this bottle being from their last year operating under that name (they merged with several other companies that year to form the American Bottle Co.).  There is also a 5 embossed at the heel which is almost certainly a date code for 1905...cool!  Anyway, this example is a pale green aqua color and has some wear and abrasions from use along with a some little "bottle bumping together" ping marks and nicks here and there too.  There is also a weird impact mark with a very hard to see though short crack at the shoulder (part of the mark visible in this image) that shows this bottle has had a hard life.  This bottle was sold to me as not cracked - it really is hard to see but is associated with the rust spot visible in the image.  I suppose this is really a place holder bottle until one can acquire a better example...and priced accordingly.   SOLD!

SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORKS - Many soda/mineral water bottlers in the West (and elsewhere) could not or just did not want to pay extra for bottles that were personalized for them (i.e., with their company name and/or location) via either private mold or plate mold so they just bought "generic" bottles from whatever bottle making company they chose.  Most of the times these bottles were not embossed on the body at all and the user just used a paper label to identify their company and product.  Sometimes the bottles had the name or initials for the glass company that made them.  This blob soda is an example of such a "generic" soda bottle that could have been used by any number of Western bottlers.  it is embossed boldly with SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORKS on one side and not embossed with anything else.  These were made sometime between the mid-1860s but prior to 1875-1876 (forget which year) when the Pacific Glass Works and San Francisco Glass Works combined into one company - the SF&PGW.  This example is about 7" tall, has an applied blob finish or lip (typical of the style), and was blown in a non-air vented mold.  This example is pretty crudely made with lots of bubbles in the glass, stretch marks on the neck and shoulder and some decent whittle throughout most of the body.  It is also a nice "San Francisco" blue aqua color.  It is near mint with really no staining, no chips, cracks, or even much wear at all.  The only "issues" I can find are a couple very small virtually invisible scuffs, one tiny pin prick on the back shoulder and a partially open bubble on the right side that is a bit over 1/8" in diameter with a  bit of dirt inside the non-open part.  Click on bubble close-up to see such.  Really not that distracting and around the side so not much of an issue...and likely in-making anyway.  Doesn't appear to have ever been professionally cleaned and is really a very nice example compared to most!  SOLD!

CAMER & JACKY / PHILLIPSBURG / MON - I've never owned many non-Pacific bordering, though still Western, soda bottles...but do have a few.  This is one that I've had for many years having picked it up at an antique store in Eureka, CA. back in the 1970s.  It is embossed as noted in a plate and was used in the still very, very small Montana town embossed on it.  I picked this soda up since when I was a teenager we dug around that area some, i.e., the ghost town of Granite on the mountain above Phillipsburg.  I visited Phillipsburg again a few years ago and it looks the same as it was 40+ years ago...maybe a bit more "groovy" than then (a popular fly fishing region now) but still a small, but neat town with many 19th century buildings still existing.  Anyway, this example is almost 6.5" tall, has a tooled blob lip or finish, smooth unmarked base, a typical aqua coloration and looks to date from the late 1890s to very early 1900s.  (This is MT0073 on Ron Fowlers GREAT Hutchinson website - www.Hutchbook.com .)  The condition is pretty good with some scattered though minor scuffing and wear to the body, a bit of very faint haze  inside and a couple minor "ping" marks to the body - a function of the bottles banging against each other in the case and common with soda bottles.  There is also a very hard to see, <1/4" small "flash" in the lip near the edge in one spot.  Overall the bottle is pretty decent and has no other issues like chips, cracks, or noticeable staining; see the images (click to enlarge) including the window shot to the below right of this and the next bottle listed below.  Not perfect, but a hard to find soda bottle from a great state.  SOLD!

LEADVILLE - That is all that is embossed on the body of this early applied blob lip Hutchinson style soda bottle from Leadville, Colorado.   The base is also embossed with a large "S" that, according to Preble's book on Colorado bottles, is for F. Schmidt an early Leadville bottler that subsequently used several other bottles with the full name on them and "S" on the base.  Preble notes that this bottle is the first one that Schmidt used around 1880-1882. This is another bottle that I acquired decades ago and actually in Leadville, CO.  This style bottle with the long sloping shoulder is really a hybrid between the earlier "gravitating stopper" style bottle (patented 1864) and the true Hutchinson style (patented in 1879) and could easily have been "closured" by either the long glass gravitating stopper or the Hutchinson spring stopper.  (See this section of my educational Historic Bottle Website for more information on both styles.)  In any event, it has the applied blob finish, 6.5"+ tall, smooth (i.e., non-pontiled) somewhat domed base with the embossed "S", and is a bluish aqua color.  Like most of these I've seen, this one has some body (and base) wear from being reused, has some small ping marks on the body and around the edge of the base, one tiny flake at the heel also, and some overall though not too distracting haze inside.  It does have some crudity befitting it's earlier manufacture in the form of bubbles in the glass and stretch marks in the shoulder/neck area.  Not in perfect shape but not real bad either; click on the images above to see more detail.  SOLD!

 


Click on the following links to go to these other pages with more bottles for sale.

BITTERS
EARLY AMERICAN BOTTLES & FLASKS
MEDICINAL "TONIC" BOTTLES
OTHER MEDICINAL BOTTLES
FOODS & CANNING JARS
SODA/MINERAL WATER & BEER
LIQUOR & MISCELLANEOUS BOTTLES & COLLECTIBLES
BOTTLE BOOKS

Listed prices do not include shipping & insurance.  Please read the Important Information for Buyers section on the main "Bottles For Sale" page for complete buyer information.

Please confirm item availability prior to sending any type payment and include your zip code in your message so that the shipping can be calculated.

Click here to return to the main Bottles For Sale Page menu



My email is -
I ask that people trying to first contact me please use the email address above not call me by searching out my phone number on the internet.

Copyright 
2017
Page Last Updated: 1/29/2017